Live LSAT class, retakes, + LSAT coaching

When you see all my online LSAT-related activities like YouTube and the podcast, you might think I live on the Internet.

Well, I do, mostly (don't we all?)

But that's not all I do.

I also regularly teach LSAT classes for pre-law societies and other student organizations.

I recently taught one at a local college here in NYC, and they let me record it. The camera angle's a little awkward (next time, I'll bring something to boost it up a bit), but it otherwise turned out fine.


Live NYC LSAT Prep Class


Back in the online world, I just taught a live class with more advice per minute than in any free session I’ve ever given.



In the session, I covered:

* My favorite LSAT retake strategies
* The best ways to use a limited # of PrepTests
* How to structure your LSAT retake study plan
* Three ways to ID your weak areas
* What to do after you'
ve already done every PrepTest
* How to decide which future LSATs to take, Digital LSAT, etc.
* Lots more.


***

LSAT Coaching Opportunity

Finally, some exciting news - I've decided I'm going to add something new on the LSAT Unplugged YouTube channel and podcast.

I normally feature discussions on there, but I want to show you what my coaching is really like.

So I'm going to open up the opportunity to all of you who are studying for the LSAT.


Coaching is for you:
* if you feel like you need some one-on-one help but don't have time to start over with a whole new course of prep.

* if you already took the LSAT, but your score didn't reflect how you were doing on your practice exams.

* if you're motivated and willing to invest the time necessary to achieve a great result.


Email me to apply, and bring whatever's holding you back. And we'll handle it. Forever.


Steve




P.S. Those LSAT classes I teach for pre-law societies and other student groups? I do it for free. Why? Because I love it. 


P.P.S. Not in NYC? Not a problem. I teach these classes online as well. Please email me, or put me in touch with your college's pre-law advisor, and we can talk about making it happen.


LSAT Podcasts and next steps after the LSAT

For those of you who took the LSAT, I hope you rocked it!

If you didn't, I know how frustrating that can be. I've been there, too. And if that's you, I'm sure you're wondering where to go from here, and what to do next.


Although I can't speak with everyone personally today, I'll share some live LSAT Q&A sessions after they got out of the LSAT.

In these LSAT Q&A sessions, I cover what to do AFTER the test, whether to cancel your score or keep it, whether to retake, etc.

Even if you didn't take the exam, check it out anyway. These session will give you plenty of ideas and strategies about what to do after you take your test. (And a chance to learn from other students' experiences.)
I've released them as part of a new LSAT project I've been working on.

A new LSAT podcast I've been working on.

I've called it LSAT Unplugged:

LSAT Unplugged Podcast
You can listen on Apple PodcastsGoogle PlaySpotify, etc.

But my biggest request is: please listen, then leave a rating and review on iTunes. It really makes a difference in helping new people find out about the podcast.

If you have decided to retake, and you're wondering what to do differently this time around to prep for Test Day, I've a few goodies for you..

The first episode of the LSAT Unplugged podcast is about whether to cancel your LSAT score and how to prepare for a retake.





If you find the podcast helpful, please leave a review on Apple Podcasts - it really makes a difference in helping new people find out about it and would mean a lot to me.


Anyway, if you're thinking about retaking, I've got a bunch of videos on YouTube about:


- how to decide whether to retake

- how to prep for a retake, including -

- what to do differently this time around


I made an entire playlist of them all to keep everything organized.



LSAT Retake YouTube Videos
I've also got a ton of articles on preparing for an LSAT retake, including:







On the other hand, if you're feeling good about it, that's great! Reach out and let me know, and let me know when you get your score, too - I love hearing success stories. 


But I also love helping students who are struggling - whether it's with an LSAT retake or law school applications.

Either way, send me your questions about what to do next.

Wherever you're at, I'll do what I can to help.


Again, check out the LSAT Unplugged podcast and let me know what you'd think. I'd love to hear your thoughts.


Looking forward to hearing from you.

Steve


P.S. Seriously, email me. I love hearing from all of you. It keeps me going - and motivates me to create more resources that will help everyone studying for the LSAT and applying to law school.


P.P.S. If you review LSAT Unplugged, I'd REALLY appreciate it. Reach out and email me. I'd love to hear from you and thank you personally.


15 LSAT Retake Strategies in 15 Minutes

For those who got your LSAT scores back, I hope you rocked it!

(Your next step will be on admissions. Resources below.)


And for those considering a retake, I've got something special for you:


My shortest LSAT class ever. Just 15 minutes long.


But get this: There's more advice per minute than in any free LSAT session I’ve ever given.

I’m calling it:



In the session, I covered:

* My favorite LSAT retake strategies
* The best ways to use a limited # of PrepTests
* How to structure your LSAT retake study plan
* Three ways to ID your weak areas
* What to do after you've already done every PrepTest
* How to decide which future LSATs to take, Digital LSAT, etc.
* Lots more.

Full Disclosure: I offered this session to build awareness around my LSAT study schedules and LSAT courses, so after I’ve shared the 15 strategies, I'll briefly shared a bit about the LSAT schedules and courses, then a general LSAT / admissions Q&A.





***

If you're done with the LSAT, congrats! I've got some law school admissions material for you - I had a great discussion with Former NYU Law Admission Officer Christina Chong:

Former NYU Law Admissions
A few other links:


More admissions resources ---->


And, as always, please feel free to reach out if you need anything at all. I'm happy to help however I can.

As always, plenty more coming your way soon. Stay tuned!

Steve


P.S. Have you subscribed to the LSAT Unplugged podcast yet?


P.P.S. Aside from chatting with Christina, I had a few other great discussions on YouTube recently. Check out the LSAT Unplugged channel for more.


LSAT score release - next steps

For those of you who recently took the LSAT, I hope you rocked it! 

If you didn't, I know how frustrating that can be. I've been there, too. And if that's you, I'm sure you're wondering where to go from here, and what to do next.


Luckily, I've got a bunch of videos on YouTube about:


- how to decide whether to retake

- how to prep for a retake, including -

- what to do differently this time around



I made an entire playlist of them all to keep everything organized.



LSAT Retake YouTube Videos
I've also got a ton of articles on preparing for an LSAT retake, including:






On the other hand, if you got a score you're happy with, congratulations! Reach out and let me know - I love hearing success stories. 

But I also love helping students who are struggling - whether it's with an LSAT retake or law school applications.

Either way, send me your questions on what to do next.

Wherever you're at, I'll do what I can to help.


Free Law School Application Resources ---->


Looking forward to hearing from you.

Steve


P.S. Seriously, reach out. I love hearing from all of you. It keeps me going - and motivates me to create more resources that will help everyone studying for the LSAT and applying to law school.



how to avoid cracking under pressure

Wanted to share some advice today about retaking the LSAT and checking your emotions.

Jared, a retaker who started with a random prep book, quickly got overwhelmed by Logic Games.

Allison, a retaker who studied while writing her senior thesis, felt the pressure was like a ton of bricks weighing her down.

Retaking is common. It sucks to have to retake, but whether that's you or not, there’s still hope!


One of the biggest reasons people have to retake is because they crack under the pressure on Test Day.
Here’s some advice on that from Allison:

The biggest piece of advice I can give to anyone prepping for the LSAT is to check your emotions. I placed a ton of pressure on myself early on, and felt extremely defeated early on in my study process, which only made things worse. Studying for the LSAT can be discouraging and anxiety-producing, but you have to keep some perspective, and trust that your work will begin to pay off.

I love seeing students increase their scores using my books and courses, but my favorite experience of all?

---- Getting to work with students directly - one-on-one. ----
In the early years, most of my students were in-person, but I now actually work with 99% of students over the phone and Skype.

Some people were skeptical of meeting this way at first, but I actually found it typically works BETTER than in-person!

Why? Because my students always have their materials with them and don't show up to sessions stressed and out of breath from the commute! :)

When we meet, I use an online whiteboard so we can diagram Logic Games together, live. And we can meet over v
ideo chat (but if you prefer audio so you can stay in your PJs, that's fine, too).

So no matter where you live, don't let that stop you from reaching out and asking for help. We can still work together. 

LSAT coaching is for you if you're frustrated, feel like you're limited in how much you can teach yourself, and realize you're in need of additional help.

So, if you feel like it might help with your situation, hit reply and let me know. As my gift to you, I'll block out 30 minutes for us to learn more about where you're at, what's holding you back, and explore the possibility of working together. 

My coaching is not for everyone. It requires dedication and commitment. Investing in your future takes courage, and only you know when you’re ready to take that leap of faith and start improving your score.

My students and I work together intensively, and their lives transform.

If you're ready to take this step and bring your LSAT prep to the next level, you know how to reach me. Shoot me a message to request a powerful conversation.

-Steve

P.S. If you’re interested in working with me one-on-one, you can find out more here ---> 

If not, that's fine - still feel free to reach out if you need anything at all.


how to improve when you don't know what you don't know

Here's the sort of email I typically get a week or two before the LSAT:

I'm still having difficulty with a few types of questions on the Logical Reasoning section, particularly following conditional chains. These chains are my weakest area and I keep getting them wrong. I've gone through all the official LSAT PrepTest books. I'm still trying to get my score up because I've been stuck with the same score (160s range). Do you have any advice? Do you think coaching could help me improve before the exam? I would really appreciate your help.

I typically get booked up in the final months before test day. And if you're seriously willing to invest the time and effort, and you've already come this far, why leave it to the last minute?

So, while he should've come to me MUCH sooner, he's still in pretty good shape because he already knows where he needs to improve. It's great when students have a specific idea of exactly what's giving them trouble, and we can go over it in detail.

But, this sort of thing isn't what I want to focus on today. 

You know what really drives me crazy?

Most students are walking around with MAJOR misconceptions about question-types and inefficient approaches I have to step in and correct.
And I'm talking about things as basic as introducing them to the difference between necessary and sufficient assumption questions!

Ideally, you'd already know about that difference months before your test date, not days.


The biggest problem students face right before the LSAT....

is they don't know what they don't know!

Students come to me struggling, scoring lower than they should be, and they DON'T KNOW WHY!

But after chatting with them for even just a few minutes, I can spot 5 different ways to help them improve, and sometimes, we can do it all in a single coaching session!

So take a few minutes to make sure you fully understand these topics:


[LR] Difference between Necessary and Sufficient Assumptions
[LG] Making Conditional Chains (with an example!) 

[RC] How to take notes (and how NOT to take them)

How to Review (sent you advice on that about a few weeks ago, I think)


It’s amazing what clearing up a single misconception or finding a more efficient approach can do. It can significantly increase your scores.

For example, take Caroline from last time. She's the one who struggled with stress and anxiety but got a PERFECT score on Logic Games:

I met with Steve and his advice was invaluable. He made something I had struggled with for so long look so easy. He showed me a completely different way of approaching games that would have taken me 10 minutes or more and taught me shortcuts that cut that time in half. Steve’s help with logic games combined with my determination to remain calm and collected about the test had me scoring an average of 173-174 leading up to test day.

So, if you're struggling (especially if you don't even know why), don't be afraid to ask for help. Reach out and we can explore the possibility of working together one-on-one.

Because even with all the courses, books, and other resources, the fastest way to get the score you need is by working directly with an expert who's already been through the process.

So, if you feel like LSAT coaching might help with your situation, let me know, and we'll talk.

And your life will transform.
-LSAT Steve


P.S. If you’re struggling with LSAT stress, I know how it feels. I’ve been there.

Next time, I’m going to share some resources I personally use to help me calm down and stay grounded when things get overwhelming.

More coming your way soon.


Getting ready for LSAT Test Day (how to study)

Lemme start by giving you some advice from Caroline (aka “The Perfect LG Scorer”):

If you are anything like me and are easily frazzled, take your PrepTests in somewhat distracting conditions (i.e. a library, coffee shop, etc.) with other people around. You may be unpleasantly surprised by a random distraction on test day and you want to be prepared so that you don’t need to retake like I did.
That’s great advice!


Here are some more tips on how to study:
* Set aside specific times of day to study.

* Do your studying out of the house (more on that later)

* Don't bring a laptop.

* Turn your phone off or put it on airplane mode.

* Eat before you leave, so that you'll be able to spend as much time there as possible.

* Bring earplugs, or get an mp3 of white noise and loop it.


Starbucks is a typical go-to location, but it can get crowded.

Someone recently suggested Dunkin Donuts and Burger King because they have lots of space.

True, they might be pretty empty, but they often also smell like the food they sell. You don't want to be hungered/disgusted by the food (depending upon your preferences), while you're studying.


Places that cater to office-worker lunch crowds are often quiet in the evening and the smell of their food may be less likely to overtake the entire restaurant. (I'm talking about places like Panera Bread, Cosi, etc.) Since they're chains, they probably won't care if you sit there for hours and hours. Also, their food is decent, so you can eat without leaving if you get hungry.


In general, if you live in a decent-sized city, look into indoor public spaces - they're usually busy during weekday lunchtime but very quiet in the evening.


If you want some tips on how to fit studying into your day, you're in luck. I've put together some tips on.....

How to fit 2-3 hours of studying into your day ---->

Reach out and let me know if you have any tips on good study locations, or if you have any other questions about anything at all. I read every message myself.

-Steve

P.S. Next time, I’ll share some tips on clearing up major LSAT misconceptions and finding a more efficient approach.



Recommended Resources:

1. LSAT Explanations
The explanations that should have come with the LSAT. These don't just fall back on "out of scope," but actually tell you why the wrong answers are wrong, why the right answers are right, and the easiest way to get the correct answer.

2. Mastering LSAT Logic Games
This guide to Logic Games is by a former writer of actual LSAT questions! Enough said.

3. Law School Personal Statement Guide
Personal statements can be hard because you have so much freedom. You can basically say anything you want, and that lack of guidance can cause a serious case of writer’s block. In situations like this, a little bit of direction can go a long way. This guide provides tips on conceptualizing, planning, writing, and editing the law school personal statement.