LSAT Writing Sample | Tips on How to Study

Easiest LSAT Writing SampleThe LSAT Writing Sample requires minimal preparation. It's so easy, this article is the only preparation you'll need.

It's true it has no impact on your LSAT score and the majority of admissions offices don't read it.

However, some do. Here's what you need to know.


When do you do the Writing Sample?

After the 5 scored sections, so your brain is bound to be fried. Admissions committees know this, so they're not expecting Shakespeare.


What do you have to write about on the Writing Sample?

The topic is different every time, but each topic has something in common - every question gives you a scenario. You're asked to decide between two options based on several factors. Each option has pros and cons, which means that you can't go wrong with either choice. All you have to do is consider the benefits and drawbacks and ultimately choose one of the two possibilities.


How should you begin the Writing Sample?

Start with your conclusion so the reader knows you picked one of the two choices. Your first sentence might be: "After weighing the pros and cons of the options presented before me, I have decided that Choice 1 is the better of the two options presented to the school / university / business." Proceed by saying something about the situation to show that you understand it. End the intro by telling the reader why Choice 2 is worse than Choice 1 for the individual facing this scenario.


But that's only the intro! How do I fill the rest of the page?

Start off your 2nd paragraph by examining each choice. Demonstrate that you understand why each one has a couple of benefits. Continue your argument by stating that the benefits of your choice outweigh those of the other potential route. If you have the time or inclination, you might say the inferior choice's downsides significantly outweigh its benefits.


How should you end the Writing Sample?


Restate the first sentence of the intro and tell the reader it's the superior choice after looking at the big picture. Say something like, "After examining the fundamental goals of our organization, it is clear that..."


How should you study for the Writing Sample?

Reading this blog post is almost all you have to do. Take another look at it, read a few writing sample prompts (located at the end of every PrepTest), and you'll know what to do on test day!



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