Free LSAT Logic Game | Grouping: Matching

LSAT Blog Logic Games Grouping MatchingYou might not know this, but a version of the LSAT has come to India. It's called, appropriately enough, LSAT-India.

In honor of the LSAT's arrival in India, this week's Logic Game is about Hindu deities.

Disclaimer: This Logic Game is in no way meant to imply that all Indian students taking the LSAT are Hindu, nor is it meant to imply that Hindu students would ever pray to deities for LSAT assistance (or that they're the only students who'd pray to Hindu deities for assistance). I've simply given the game this topic because I think Hindu deities are cool, and because I promised I'd write a logic game about non-Greek deities.

Please post your thoughts and questions in the comments!

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Here's this week's Logic Game:

Exactly four students-Arjun, Bobby, Jason, and Puja-pray to exactly seven Hindu deities-Ganesha, Hanuman, Krishna, Lakshmi, Rama, Shiva, and Vishnu-for assistance in achieving top LSAT scores. No deity answers the prayers of all four students, but each deity answers at least one student's prayer. The deities answer the students' prayers according to the following conditions:
Neither Lakshmi nor Rama answers Bobby's prayers, but Ganesha and Krishna both answer Bobby's.
Hanuman, Krishna, and Shiva answer Puja's prayers.
Hanuman answers at least three students' prayers, but Krishna and exactly one other deity each answer exactly two students' prayers.
If Vishnu answers a particular student's prayer, Hanuman does not answer that student's prayer.
If Ganesha answers a particular student's prayer, Rama does not answer that student's prayer.
Lakshmi answers at least one of the same students' prayers as Vishnu does.
Any deity who answers Puja's prayers also answers Bobby's but does not answer Arjun's.
1. For how many of the seven deities can one determine exactly which students' prayers are answered by each?

(A) two
(B) three
(C) four
(D) five
(E) six


2. If Shiva does not answer Jason's prayers, which one of the following could be true?

(A) Ganesha and Krishna answer exactly the same students' prayers as each other.
(B) Lakshmi answers both Arjun's prayers and Jason's prayers.
(C) Both Lakshmi and Rama answer Jason's prayers.
(D) Exactly three of the seven deities answer Jason's prayers.
(E) Exactly four of the seven deities answer exactly one student's prayers.


3. Which one of the following, if known, would allow one to determine exactly which students' prayers are answered by each deity?

(A) Ganesha answers the prayers of exactly one student.
(B) Ganesha answers the prayers of exactly three students.
(C) Lakshmi answers the prayers of exactly two students.
(D) Rama answers the prayers of exactly two students.
(E) Shiva answers the prayers of exactly three students.


4. Which one of the following could be a pair of deities both of whom answer the prayers of exactly three students?

(A) Ganesha and Krishna
(B) Ganesha and Lakshmi
(C) Ganesha and Shiva
(D) Hanuman and Rama
(E) Hanuman and Vishnu


5. Each of the following could be a pair of deities both of whom answer the prayers of exactly two students EXCEPT:

(A) Ganesha, Krishna
(B) Krishna, Lakshmi
(C) Krishna, Rama
(D) Krishna, Shiva
(E) Krishna, Vishnu


6. Which one of the following is a complete and accurate list of deities, any one of whom could be a deity who answers Arjun's prayers?

(A) Ganesha, Hanuman, Lakshmi, Rama, Shiva, Vishnu
(B) Ganesha, Krishna, Lakshmi, Rama, Vishnu
(C) Ganesha, Lakshmi, Rama, Vishnu
(D) Hanuman, Lakshmi, Rama, Vishnu
(E) Lakshmi, Rama, Vishnu


7. Which one of the following CANNOT be true?

(A) Exactly three of the seven deities answer exactly the same students' prayers as each other.
(B) Exactly three of the seven deities answer Arjun's prayers.
(C) Exactly three of the seven deities answer Jason''s prayers.
(D) Exactly four of the seven deities answer Arjun's prayers.
(E) Exactly four of the seven deities answer Jason's prayers.


Here's one more question, just for fun:

8. Each of the following could be a complete and accurate list of students whose prayers are answered by Ganesha EXCEPT:

(A) Arjun, Bobby
(B) Bobby, Jason
(C) Bobby, Puja
(D) Arjun, Bobby, Jason
(E) Bobby, Puja, Jason

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Read the below if you have no idea how to set up this game, and you want a hint.

Make the deities your "base" - not the students. This will allow you to make inferences more easily.

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The text below contains the answers to the above Logic Game.

1. B
2. E
3. D
4. C
5. E
6. C
7. D
8. D

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See my explanation and diagrams of this game in Logic Games Matching Diagram | Explanation.

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If you want to try several LSAC-written Logic Games that are similar to the one above, check out the 4th category of games in 7 LSAT Logic Games That Repeated on Future PrepTests.

Photo by pingu1963



25 comments:

  1. Steve, what a horrible game you have come up with... Let's hope we don't get any of those on the September LSAT!

    Can you explain 2? Looks to me like there could be more than one true answer to this one.

    I'm likely missing a rule/deduction. Do you assume that if a deity responds to Bobby's prayers, they also respond to Puja's? Because only the other way around is implied in the rules.

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  2. This game was a lot of fun and, and at least for me, very challenging. How would rate the difficulty of this one? I think I didn't spend enough time setting up and thinking through the relatively few possible arrangements in the beginning, and as a result spent way too long puzzling over the alternatives.

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  3. Could you explain 3, 4, and 8 please? I think I understand the answers, but an explanation would help me laods!

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  4. Steve already works way too hard, so I'll give this a try:
    #2:
    If Shiva doesn't answer Jason's prayers, then we know that Shiva's students are complete and thus that the rest of the Gods are answering either 1 or 3 students (since we know from the rules that in addition to K, one other God answers exactly two prayers, and since the combo of all four students is not possible because of the if P -> notA rule.) Another important thing to realize is that the only two valid 3 student options (since you can only match 1 student or 3 students with a God) are JPB or JBA. That should help you get there.
    #3: One of the key things to know in order to know the distribution of all the students is the numerical distribution--and the fact that Rama answers teh prayers of two students means that the rest answer either 1-3 students; which means that L just answers A's prayers (since B and P are out, and L can't answer 2 prayers), and since R can't answer B or P's prayers, we know R answers A and J's prayers, and we also know that S has to answer JBP because Rama has taken up the two-student slot (and, as explained above, JBA isn't gonna fly). Another way to look at this is to realize that the rest of the answers, if you applied them, wouldn't give you the complete solution for some reason--some of the Gods would still not be matched precisely to students and there would still be doubt. R answering two closes off all other possibilities.
    #4: This question really tests your understanding of the interaction between G&R and H&V & the numerical distributions. a - doesn't work b/c K can only have 2 (it's closed off). b doesn't work because L can only have 2 (it can't have b and therefore can't have P.) d - there aren't 3 students available for R (same reason there aren't 3 available for L). e - H&V interaction means that V can only answer A's prayer. which leaves C!
    #8:
    If G answers A, B & J, then that means that P would be the only available student for R to answer. But we know that R can't answer P because then R would also have to answer B's prayer, which isn't allowed.

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  5. Wow thanks for the game. I got 7/8 right even though it took me longer to set it up. I think this game illustrated the importance of reading properly and making proper inferences. The only question I find a bit confusing is number 3 but I will go over that right now. Thanks! :)

    But yes like the others said this game would be classified as difficult or very difficult. It takes a while to figure out how to approach the questions and just exactly how many inferences there really are to be made.

    AC

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  6. Appreciate the game. Did not help the confidence, but I learned.

    My question is on the hint. In general should I always use the group with the most characters as the base? Or is it a game by game basis depending on the contraints? Thanks

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  7. very difficult game. lucky to get most of them right after too long. spent way too much time on the set-up and the inferences/deductions. this was almost as bad, if not worse, than the greek god hierarchy game. I hope LSAC doesn't read this blog and get any ideas..

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  8. great game! really fun!

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  9. where are the answers ??

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  10. Ok I'm lost on #6
    The last rule states any deity who answers Puja also answer Bobby but does NOT answer Arjun

    How can C be the answer if Ganesha asnwers both Bobby and Puja? How can Ganesha be included to answer Arjun?

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    Replies
    1. 6.) This question asks for a COMPLETE list of those who COULD answer Arjun's prayers. This doesn't mean that each of them that could answer will answer. Essentially, you'll eliminate every single god that absolutely CANNOT answer Arjun.

      The following cannot answer Arjun: H, K, and S. Thus, the answer for question 6 is option C which states Ganesha, Lakshmi, Rama, and Vishnu can answer Arjun's prayers. Let me explain why:

      We know that H answers at least 3 students' prayers, but one of the rules state that no deity can answer all four students' prayers. Thus, H will answer three students' prayers. We already know that H answers Puja because the rules state so. The rules also state that any deity that answers Puja's prayers will answer the prayers of Bobby but not Arjun. So, H answers P, B, and J (BUT NOT A). Any answer choice with H is wrong, eliminating answer options A and D.

      K also cannot answer Arjun. The rules state that Krishna answers Bobby's prayers. The rules also state that Krishna answers Puja's prayers as well as the fact that Krishna only answers two students' prayers. Krishna can ONLY answer Bobby's and Puja's prayers. Any option with Krishna is wrong, eliminating option B.

      Shiva CANNOT answer Arjun's prayers. We know this because the rules state that Shiva answers Puja's prayers. The rules also state that any deity that answers Puja's prayers will answer Bobby's BUT NOT answer Arjun's. We have already eliminated option A, but it's important to understand why Shiva can't answer Arjun.

      There are no other rules restricting which deities can answer Arjun. This means that the following deities can answer Arjun: G, L, R, and V. Since this is what the question is asking, it is the answer (option C).

      As far as Ganesha is concerned, the only prayers we can be sure Ganesha is answering are Bobby's since the rules state so. The rule that is confusing some, "Any deity who answers Puja's prayers also answers Bobby's but does not Answer Arjun's" has nothing to do with if Ganesha can answer Arjun. This rule is a condition and so it depends on the deities that answer PUJA's prayers--NOT BOBBY'S. If a deity answers Puja's prayers, this means that that same deity will answer Bobby's prayers. However, no rule exists stating that any deity that answers Bobby's prayers will have to answer Puja's. Thus, since we cannot eliminate Ganesha as a possibility, Answer choice E is not a COMPLETE list and is wrong.

      Option C is correct.

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  11. #6

    The rule is that if a deity answers Puja's prayers, they must also answer Bobby's but not Arjun. The gives you P --> B and not A. The reverse is A or not B --> not P. But it doesn't say anything about if a deity answers Bobby's prayers. Basically, And deity answering Puja has to answer Bobby. Any deity answering Bobby doesn't necessarily have to answer Puja.

    Hope that helps!

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  12. Great game. It took me about twenty-five minutes to answer the first two questions (albeit incorrectly), but the others went by quickly. This game is good for building mental stamina and for forcing one to use all of his/her tricks.

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  13. Someone please explain! In the setup it says that H,K,S all answer P thus they would also answer B as per the last rule.

    -DOES'NT THIS ESSENTIALLY SOLVE THE GAME???

    H-PBJ
    K-PB
    S-PB

    After this we know that V must have A and that L must also have A. R-J/A, G-B/J, V can only answer A b/c of rule 4...

    Please help.

    Thanks!

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  14. You are partially correct, however, those are the only deities that are fully accounted for (Question 1.) Most of the questions deal with the other deities in the game.

    H-jbp
    K-pb
    V-a

    S does answer pb but is able to answer j as well.
    Hope this helps

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  15. This was incredibly hard for me. I've been getting almost everything right on your study guides but I didn't come close on any of these questions. Is that just because this was extremely hard? What are the chances of something like this being on the lsat? With this much ambiguity?

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  16. For #2, answer choice B, does that mean that Lakshmi ONLY listens to Arjun and Jason? Does that prohibit Lakshmi from listening to Bobby's prayers?

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  17. Very nice. Am I the only student of Steve's out here studying for the JUNE LSAT?
    Or am I just the only commenting?

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  18. I don't get why number 1 isn't 2...how did he get 3?

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  19. Tough but fun game....I guess it shouldn't have taken me nearly 30 minutes to complete....God damn I need a lot of work!!!!

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  20. It wasn't as tough as I expected from the previous comments. I found the second rule really important to setting up the game.

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  21. Great game, it was really hard and therefore, great practice! Thank you!

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  22. #6 is clearly wrong... How can G and R both answer A?? The 5th rule states that if G answers a particular student's question, then R does not.. In the explanation, you are given the not diagram for G and R. Sorry, steve, you messed up this time.

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  23. Ohhh correction for the last comment... "Any which of whom".. sorry steve lol.. you're great!

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  24. This game killed me. It took me over 17 mins and I had to skip one question...praying to God I will never encounter a game like this one!

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