Newer Logic Games: Before, After, But Not Both | PrepTest 53

Newer Logic Games Rules Before AfterThis post is the third of a three-part series on conditional sequencing rules in newer Logic Games. The first part of this series covers an easier version of the conditional sequencing rule.

This post will explain the "before, after, but not both" rules of the 2nd game in PrepTest 53 (December 2007).

PrepTest 53, Game 2

The game starts off, "A competition is being held to select a design for Yancy College's new student union building..."

The rules I'm about to describe are exactly like the rule I described in the second post of this series.

However, because this type of rule confuses many students the first time around, I'm going to explain these rules anyway.

If you feel comfortable with the rule, that's great! Attempt the rules in this game yourself, then check them against my explanations below.

2nd rule of the game:

"Green's design is presented either at some time before Jackson's or at some time after Liu's, but not both."

This means that either both variables come before G, or both come after G.

(Keep in mind one of the game's other limitations, which is that no two variables can occur simultaneously - they must all occur at different times.)


1st possibility:
If G is before J, then G is not after L.

If G is not after L, G is before L.

Therefore, G is before both J and L.

LSAT Blog PrepTest 53 Game 2 Rule 1 Possibility 1









2nd possibility:


If G is after L, then G is not before J.

If G is not before J, G is after J.

Therefore, G is after both L and J.

LSAT Blog PrepTest 53 Game 2 Rule 1 Possibility 2









Our possibilities are:


LSAT Blog PrepTest 53 Game 2 Rule 1 Possibilities
















Each valid scenario (ordering of the variables) will feature one of these possibilities or the other.


3rd rule of the game:


"Valdez's design is presented either at some time before Green's or at some time after Peete's, but not both."

This means that either both variables come before V, or both come after V.


1st possibility:
If V is before G, then V is not after P.

If V is not after P, V is before P.

Therefore, V is before both G and P.

LSAT Blog PrepTest 53 Game 2 Rule 2 Possibility 1







2nd possibility:
If V is after P, then V is not before G.

If V is not before G, V is after G.

Therefore, V is after both G and P.

LSAT Blog PrepTest 53 Game 2 Rule 2 Possibility 2







Our possibilities are:


LSAT Blog PrepTest 53 Game 2 Rule 2 Possibilities















Each valid scenario (ordering of the variables) will feature one of these possibilities or the other.

***

The two possibilities in each of the two rules above can be combined into 4 different possibilities:
LSAT Blog PrepTest 53 Game 2 All 4 Possibilities Combined











On the top-left, we have G before both J and L - combined with V before both P and G.

On the top-right, we have G before both J and L - combined with V after both P and G.

On the bottom-left, we have G after both J and L - combined with V after both P and G.

On the bottom-right, we have G after both J and L - combined with V after both P and G.

***

The rules described in this series haven't come up in the most recent exams, but that doesn't necessarily mean they won't come up in the near future.

After reading this series, you'll be ready for any "before, after, but not both rule" they throw at you.

Photo by winton / CC BY 2.0
(I included the Scrabble photo because Scrabble is a game and because that particular board has the word "logic" in it.)



4 comments:

  1. Hey Steve, do you know if they ended up using these rules in PT 57 (June 2009), or what would've been PT 58, 59, or 60?

    I don't have any problems with these, but the wording is just a little confusing, so I was wondering if they've been included on any of the recent ones.

    What are the possibilities of it occuring on the June 2010 test?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hey John,

    They didn't use these in 57 (June 2009), 58 (September 2009, or 59 (December 2009). 60 is June 2010.

    It's possible that these will be on the June 2010 test, but no one can say for certain except LSAC.

    They're worth learning just in case.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Why didn't you combine and end up with the two possibilities are: V before GPLJ (Option 1)
    LPJG before V (Option 2)?

    ReplyDelete
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