"The Director's Cut" aka Unofficial LSAT Logic Games Questions for PrepTests 29-38


I love movies, and one of my favorite things is when a “Director’s Cut” comes out.

Here, directors get to include all of the scenes that were left out of the final film because of pacing, time or some other mysterious reason.

But these scenes almost ALWAYS make the movie better (in my humble opinion, anyway).

Almost.

The original was better.


Anyway, when I was looking at LSAT PrepTests 29-38, I couldn’t help but feel like there were more questions that could’ve been asked. More “scenes” they could’ve included, if you will.

So I’ve gone through and written 40 extra questions, one for EACH of the 40 Logic Games contained in those PrepTests.

LSAT Blog Unofficial Logic Games Questions for PrepTests 29-38 Cover

These questions are tough, and they’re supposed to be! They’re meant to give you some practice that’s relevant to the modern LSAT.

These are the questions the LSAT-makers:

-should have asked 
-could have asked 
-would have asked 

but they didn't.

So I am asking these questions.

Why?

There are plenty of LSAT Logic Games out there, but if you’ve done some of the newest games from PrepTests in the 70s and 80s, you’ll notice that they contain lots of weird “curveball” games – and really tough questions!

Funny thing is, some of the games in PrepTests 40-59 are actually EASIER than the ones in the 30s. PrepTests 29-38 contain some of the toughest Logic Games of all time (like the infamous CDs game featured in Legally Blonde).

Elle Woods trying to solve CDs game (PT31, G2)


So if my questions are the "Director’s Cut" extended version to give you greatest amount of prep material possible...

those misleadingly easy games in the 40s and 50s are the dollar-bin direct-to-DVD sequels no one asked for.




Alright, enough with the analogies.

These are difficult practice questions that might as well have been written by LSAC - and you can't find them anywhere else.

By using them along with the games in PrepTests 29-38, you ensure that you're practicing with difficult material relevant to the modern LSAT.


Ready to rock?


Click here to get your copy for only $14.97:





Quick note:

Remember, in order to benefit from this, you must separately get the games contained within LSAT PrepTests 29-38. This doesn't include the actual games or explanations for those exams.

Oh, and one other quick note. If you’ve already registered with PayPal, the PDF goes right to that account, so make sure to check it if you’re using more than one e-mail. Nothing is worse than thinking you didn’t get the email only to have it wind up in that Yahoo mail account you made back in the ninth grade with the embarrassing name.  It’s ok, we’ve all got one.


P.S. If you're having any second thoughts about this, just remember that I offer a full 30-day money-back guarantee. If FOR ANY REASON you don’t like the questions, just show me you did the work, and I'll give you back all your money the very next day. 

Sincerely,

Steve "LSAT question-writer" Schwartz


P.P.S. These questions are only for those serious about improving their LSAT scores. If you're not willing to even try solving the questions...then please don't buy.








4 comments:

  1. Steve,

    So far so good. I am loving the 2 month study guide and this set of bonus logic games you made up to compliment the LGs from 29-38. However, I think I might have found a mistake :o)

    My issue is with the bonus question for this problem set - Prep Test 30 - Game 2 (pg51 Next 10 book).

    Your bonus question is a "which of the following could be true" given the following four scenarios.

    A) Violates the numbers limit, if G leaves a message the other 5 people also have to leave messages, G can not appear twice.

    B) Violates rule 1. if L is 1 and 3, G, F andP can not be used. Use of G would violate the numbers limit and the use of F or P would force H before L which is impossible is L is one, therefore only T can be used and T can not leave more than 1 message since L already has.

    C) Essentially same concept I outlined for B. T can not be 1 and 3, violates rule 1.

    D) If H is 4, 5, 6 that means F, L, P and T are left to fill the remaining spaces. The use of F or P force H to come before L, which is impossible if H is in spaces 4, 5 and 6.

    E) This was the credited answer on the answer sheet and I believe it is mistaken. If P is 4, 5, 6 then F, G, H, and L are left to fill the remaining spaces. H and L can fill any combination of 1, 2 and 3 as long as they are only used once and H is before L (rule 6 if P then H -L). So either F or G is left to fill that space, G can't because of a numbers violation and F can't because that would mean P would have to be before T and that is impossible since T is 4, 5 and 6.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Steve, My apologies. Mistake is on me!

    Just realized I could have simply used T to fill the last space without using F or G and therefore not violating the F-->P before T rule or the numbers limit. Easiest game of the day trips me up!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Steve,

    I just came across the same problem Shawn had, but I do not think his remedy for the quandary solves the problem. If P is in slot 4,5, and 6 we can put h-l in slots 1 and 2 or 2 and 3,any of which works out just fine. However, if since P takes up the last three slots, and we know from rule 5 that all of P's messages must precede any of T's, then we can conclude that T must not be used. Thus, space 1 or 3 must be filled with either F or G. But again we run into a problem. If G is used, F must also be used (as well as T) and that could not be right because we only have one more slot to fill. And F is used, T will also have to be used and that is not acceptable because we have concluded that T cannot be used and we have only one remaining space to fill.

    ReplyDelete
  4. The rule that "All Ps must go before all Ts" is only activated when F is used.

    If P is going 3 times, the only variables we'll use in this scenario are H, L, P, and T.

    T can go before P in this situation.

    ReplyDelete