Showing posts with label practice tests. Show all posts
Showing posts with label practice tests. Show all posts

LSAC Bans LSAT PrepTest PDF Sales

LSAC Bans LSAT PrepTest PDF Sales
Unfortunately, some bad news for LSAT test-takers:

I recently learned from LSAC that they are putting an end to LSAT PrepTest PDF sales.

This isn't a joke, and it's not an early April Fools' prank.

LSAC recently made some changes to its licensing policy for 2015. Because I sell LSAT PrepTest PDFs to the general public, I received word of these changes.

Via email, LSAC wrote to licensees:

Attached is our revised Rights Management Document regarding electronic distribution of LSAT content to your program students and the general public. All renewing and future licenses must comply with this policy.  
One important and necessary change is our preference that you do not use/distribute PDFs. [emphasis added. However, if you are able to demonstrate that PDFs can be made secure when sold to your course registrants only, it is possible we would approve this use.

In other words, LSAC will not allow licensees to sell LSAT PrepTest PDFs to the general public any longer. This change will go into effect as licenses come up for renewal. LSAT Blog's license expires this coming Monday, March 23rd, so if you want to buy LSAT PrepTest PDFs, get them now.

Why LSAT PrepTest Scores Fluctuate

Many LSAT test-takers think everyone has one "true" LSAT score, just like everyone supposedly has one "true" IQ score. Of course, taking an IQ test at age 20 and age 50 would likely generate different results. But I'd imagine that even taking two IQ tests a week or a day apart would likely generate slightly different results.

So, why do so many people think they should keep getting approximately the same LSAT score when taking timed LSAT PrepTests before Test Day?

This idea may have something to do with intuitions about grades, but even grades aren't necessarily constant. While people tend to be jealous of the person who "gets straight A's," I can't think of someone who got only As. I often got As, but I also got A-s and even (gasp) B+s.

For some people, this comes from the idea that the LSAT is a test you can study for, and improve on. "I've studied my way to a 170, so that's now my true score. How could I possibly get significantly lower scores? Am I getting dumber?"


Reasons your LSAT scores can fluctuate:

People often fail to consider that there is an element of randomness involved on standardized exams.

-With a limit on the number of questions that can be asked, some concepts that you're good at might not appear, leading your score to be lower than it would've been otherwise.

-A concept that doesn't always appear might show up on your test. If it's something you're shaky on, again, your score might end up being lower than it would've been otherwise.

As always, the safest course of action to guard against unanticipated low scores is to learn everything. No easy answers here, sorry.

Some other factors that lead to score drops - burnout, sleep deprivation, stress, and poor health. Make sure to get enough sleep, eat well, and get moderate exercise. This stuff really makes a difference.


Free LSAT Quiz: LSAT or Kanye West?

Here's a free, short LSAT quiz:

Who said it - the LSAT or Kanye West?

1. “Why everything that's supposed to be bad make me feel so good?”

Preparing for the December 2011 LSAT Experimental Section

LSAT Blog December 2011 LSAT Experimental SectionIn my LSAT study schedules, I recommend that you include extra sections in your practice exams. Why would I recommend such a cruel and difficult task?

Because LSAC uses test-takers as lab rats (like many organizations that administer standardized exams - think back to the SAT). LSAC includes an unscored experimental section on the LSAT and doesn't tell you which one it is. If you knew which one it was, you'd probably take a nap to recuperate between the sections you care about - the scored ones.

To LSAC's credit, this practice increases the validity of the scored sections of future LSATs. The experimental section allows LSAC to pre-test questions with several thousand applicants, helping LSAC determine which questions deserve to make it into future scored sections.

On the other hand, not knowing which section is the experimental can make it difficult to decide whether or not to cancel your score. If you bomb the experimental section, it may affect your performance on the other sections. Additionally, being forced to "donate" 35 minutes of free research for LSAC after paying to take the LSAT hardly seems fair.

Regardless, because you'll see a 5-section exam on test day, rather than the 4 you're used to seeing in your LSAT PrepTests, it's essential to prepare.

I decided to write this post after blog reader Katie wrote to me with the following question:
I have been taking 4 section timed tests for a while now but am starting to take 5 and 6 section timed tests as you suggest. I have two questions:

1. I assume that the type of "extra" section(s) I include should vary from test to test. For example, on one day, I would add a logic games section and the next day either a reading comprehension or a logical reasoning section. Is this what you would recommend?

2. What is the best way to score these tests? Which section do I omit? I took a test last night and did an extra logical reasoning section. The scoring for the test I took the extra section from was very different from the full test I was taking - does this make sense? I want to make sure I'm getting an accurate read of my performance.

Varying extra sections
There are two main approaches I'd recommend:

-You can rotate the type of "extra" section(s) that you use.
-You can make the extra section(s) the one that you like the least.

For most people, a combination of the two is probably ideal. Figure out which type of section you dread the most, and include it more often than the others.


Which section to omit
This makes perfect sense, Katie. To get the most accurate score reading, omit the section(s) that are not from the original exam. Different exams have different scales.


Some more tips on preparing for the experimental section:

Where to place the unscored section.
In the past, I recommended that you place the experimental sections in the first 3 sections out of the 5 that you complete for your practice exams. That's where the experimental had traditionally fallen on test day. Until recently, test-takers reported that it had always been one of the first 3 sections.

However, on the October 2011 LSAT, many test-takers reported having the experimental as their 4th section on Test Day - for this reason, I recommend that you also include it as the 4th or 5th section in at least a few practice exams, just in case.

It's unfortunate that you may have to take the unscored section when you're less fatigued, but just remember everyone else is affected in the same way.


Mix up sections.
As I said earlier, on test day, you won't know which section is the experimental. For this reason, you may want to lay out the sections from each PrepTest beforehand. Take two from the "scored" exam and one "unscored" experimental, and mix them together.

This way, you won't know which ones are scored and which ones aren't, and you'll be forced to put the same effort into each.

Photo by happysteve


LSAT PrepTest 64 (October 2011 LSAT) Available For PDF Download

LSAT Blog PrepTest 64 October 2011 LSAT PDF DownloadJust wanted to let everyone know that the October 2011 LSAT (LSAT PrepTest 64) is now available on Amazon.com!

See this list of all LSAT PrepTests.

It's the most recently released LSAT exam and necessary for anyone studying for December 2011 LSAT and beyond.

How to Recover from LSAT Burnout

LSAT Blog Recover From LSAT BurnoutAs the LSAT approaches, you've probably started clutching your PrepTests for protection. Your friends have started to compare you to Linus from the Peanuts comic, who carries his blanket wherever he goes.

However, if you've been studying for a while, you might be sick of the LSAT by now. Your body might start to reject the LSAT like an organ transplant gone wrong.

So how do you continue to prepare when you feel like you just can't take it anymore, but the LSAT's still a couple of weeks away?

More importantly, how do you know whether your aversion to the LSAT is due to burnout or laziness? Believe it or not, people sometimes mistake one for the other.

Here are some tips to help you determine whether it's burnout or laziness, and, if it's the former, how to deal with it.


Burnout vs. Laziness

1. Average PrepTest scores drop
If your PrepTest scores have recently dropped below your average PrepTest score, it's probably burnout.

If your score was never high to begin with, it's probably laziness.


2. Careless mistakes
If most of your recent mistakes are due to carelessness, rather than a lack of understanding, it's probably burnout.

If you just make a lot of mistakes in general, it's probably laziness.


3. Studying but feel like it's going nowhere
If you've done several practice exams recently and feel like it's going nowhere, it's probably burnout.

If you haven't done anything recently and feel like you're studying's going nowhere, it's probably laziness.


4. Feel guilty for taking short breaks
If you took a break from studying for an hour and felt guilty, it's probably burnout.

If you took a break from studying for a month and felt guilty, it's probably laziness.


5. Studying 10 hours per day
If you study for 10 hours per day, it's probably burnout.

If you think about the LSAT for several hours every day, and you count those hours as actual studying, it's probably laziness. (Note: lawyers often bill for this kind of "work" too, so you'll be in good company after graduating from law school)


If you've identified your problem as laziness, read 5 Reasons to Stay Motivated During LSAT Prep.

If your problem is burnout, read on.

How to recover from LSAT burnout
You may just need a break to recharge your batteries.

The burned-out student might say, "But I can't stop studying now! The test is 2 1/2 weeks away, and I still have another 30 PrepTests to finish before then."

You may not have any brain cells remaining if you try to do that many PrepTests in such a short period of time.

The LSAT's like riding a bike. Memorization's not involved, so cramming won't work. Sure, there are some things you need to remember. However, if taking a day or two off makes you forget them, you probably didn't understand them in the first place. The LSAT is about skills and a particular mindset, not facts.

So take a day or two off and exercise, watch a TV show or two, whatever you like to do to unwind.

Then rebuild your confidence by redoing your favorite Logic Games, Logical Reasoning questions, or Reading Comprehension passages. This will help you get back in the groove and gear you up to get back on schedule.

Photo by apelad


Preparing for the October 2011 LSAT Experimental Section

LSAT Blog October 2011 LSAT Experimental SectionDid you take the October 2011 LSAT? Check out previous October LSAT score release dates and predict the curve!

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In my LSAT study schedules, I recommend that you include extra sections in your practice exams. Why would I recommend such a cruel and difficult task?

Because LSAC uses test-takers as lab rats (like many organizations that administer standardized exams - think back to the SAT). LSAC includes an unscored experimental section on the LSAT and doesn't tell you which one it is. If you knew which one it was, you'd probably take a nap to recuperate between the sections you care about - the scored ones.

To LSAC's credit, this practice increases the validity of the scored sections of future LSATs. The experimental section allows LSAC to pre-test questions with several thousand applicants, helping LSAC determine which questions deserve to make it into future scored sections.

On the other hand, not knowing which section is the experimental can make it difficult to decide whether or not to cancel your score. If you bomb the experimental section, it may affect your performance on the other sections. Additionally, being forced to "donate" 35 minutes of free research for LSAC after paying to take the LSAT hardly seems fair.

Regardless, because you'll see a 5-section exam on test day, rather than the 4 you're used to seeing in your LSAT PrepTests, it's essential to prepare.

I decided to write this post after blog reader Katie wrote to me with the following question:
I have been taking 4 section timed tests for a while now but am starting to take 5 and 6 section timed tests as you suggest. I have two questions:

1. I assume that the type of "extra" section(s) I include should vary from test to test. For example, on one day, I would add a logic games section and the next day either a reading comprehension or a logical reasoning section. Is this what you would recommend?

2. What is the best way to score these tests? Which section do I omit? I took a test last night and did an extra logical reasoning section. The scoring for the test I took the extra section from was very different from the full test I was taking - does this make sense? I want to make sure I'm getting an accurate read of my performance.

Varying extra sections
There are two main approaches I'd recommend:

-You can rotate the type of "extra" section(s) that you use.
-You can make the extra section(s) the one that you like the least.

For most people, a combination of the two is probably ideal. Figure out which type of section you dread the most, and include it more often than the others.


Which section to omit
This makes perfect sense, Katie. To get the most accurate score reading, omit the section(s) that are not from the original exam. Different exams have different scales.


Another tip on preparing for the experimental section:

Mix up sections.
As I said earlier, on test day, you won't know which section is the experimental. For this reason, you may want to lay out the sections from each PrepTest beforehand. Take two from the "scored" exam and one "unscored" experimental, and mix them together.

This way, you won't know which ones are scored and which ones aren't, and you'll be forced to put the same effort into each.

Photo by happysteve

Starting LSAT Studying When You Wake Up: Bad Idea

LSAT Blog LSAT Studying Starting Wake UpStarting your LSAT studying when you first wake up is not a good idea. It doesn't matter whether you wake up in the morning or afternoon.

Why? Because your brain needs time to get out of sleep mode. It's called sleep inertia.

One of my LSAT students emailed me with the following:

I was trying to take your most recent advice to heart: study 2-3 hours a day. One way to do this is to get up early and practice in the morning before work/school.

Any researcher of sleep physiology will tell you that your brain is not fully awake and capable of operating at its optimum capacity until 90 minutes after you have awoken.

More important than the actual preparation is your test day "readiness", one aspect of which is your clarity of thinking. Getting on a schedule where you are used to being up and "fully awake" in the sense described above would be important for your actual performance.

Some of your students most likely are used to sleeping from 12-1-2 am to 7:30-8 am. It would be a terrible mistake to keep this schedule the day, week, even fortnight before the test date. Establishing a schedule that allows your brain to be fully awake at 8 am on LSAT test day will be an important contribution to your performance.

Of course, that last part doesn't apply to all you June test-takers because the June exam starts in the afternoon.

However, even if you're taking the June exam, this still means you shouldn't study when you first wake up in the morning.

Here's an example of research supporting this:

Grogginess, Disorientation On Awakening More Debilitating Than Sleep Deprivation

Excerpts:
The study showed test subjects had diminished short-term memory, counting skills and cognitive abilities during the groggy period upon awakening known as sleep inertia...

For a short period, at least, the effects of sleep inertia may be as bad as or worse than being legally drunk...

The most severe effects of sleep inertia generally dissipated within the first 10 minutes, although its effects are often detectable for up to two hours...

Another study referenced in that link indicates:
[C]ortical areas of the brain like the prefrontal cortex take longer to come "on-line" following sleep than other areas of the brain...The prefrontal cortex is thought to be responsible for problem solving, emotion and complex thought."

So, if you wake up at 7AM, you're probably not going to operate at 100% until close to 9AM. While most of the effects of sleep inertia go away pretty quickly, it's the prefrontal cortex that you really need for your studying.

Problem solving and complex thought sound like LSAT-related tasks to me.

When you first wake up, do other stuff before you start your LSAT studying. Eat breakfast, shower, exercise, check email, etc.

If you do your LSAT studying as soon as you wake up, you're likely to do less than your best. The LSAT can be frustrating enough without sleep inertia - don't make things harder than they have to be.

Photo by fofurasfelinas


Complete LSAT PrepTest Explanations PDF

LSAT Blog PrepTest Explanations PDF CompleteUPDATE: LSAT explanations for these exams are now available in various bundles as PDFs.

Please disregard the below.

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Complete Explanations for LSAT PrepTests 47-59 (October 2005 LSAT - December 2009 LSAT) are now available for instant PDF download.

One of the most common requests I get from my students and blog readers is for explanations of particular LSAT questions.

Although I'll explain any question in my LSAT tutoring, there's a limit to the amount I have time to write down.

Fortunately, I just learned that fellow LSAT tutor Matt has written complete explanations for every single question in each section of LSAT PrepTests 47-59 (October 2005 LSAT - December 2009 LSAT). The explanations for each PrepTest are over 50 pages in length. Not only do these explain why the right answer is right, but they also discuss why each wrong answer is wrong.

At the moment, each exam's complete explanations are only

Enjoy!

***
You can download complete explanations for the free June 2007 LSAT PrepTest (PDF) to see what they're like. Download the June 2007 LSAT PrepTest (PDF) to follow along.

Rather than having to add over a dozen different sets of PrepTest explanations to your cart one-by-one, you can save time by clicking the range of sets of explanations you'd like:


Explanations for LSAT PrepTests 47-59

Explanations for LSAT PrepTests 47-51

Explanations for LSAT PrepTests 52-59


Also click the relevant link below to add each individual set of complete LSAT PrepTest explanations to your cart.


LSAT PrepTest 63 Explanations (June 2010 LSAT) PDF

LSAT PrepTest 62 Explanations (December 2010 LSAT) PDF

LSAT PrepTest 59 Explanations (December 2009 LSAT) PDF

LSAT PrepTest 58 Explanations (September 2009 LSAT) PDF

LSAT PrepTest 57 Explanations (June 2009 LSAT) PDF

LSAT PrepTest 56 Explanations (December 2008 LSAT) PDF

LSAT PrepTest 55 Explanations (October 2008 LSAT) PDF

LSAT PrepTest 54 Explanations (June 2008 LSAT) PDF

LSAT PrepTest 53 Explanations (December 2007 LSAT) PDF

LSAT PrepTest 52 Explanations (September 2007 LSAT) PDF

LSAT PrepTest 51 Explanations (December 2006 LSAT) PDF

LSAT PrepTest 50 Explanations (September 2006 LSAT) PDF

LSAT PrepTest 49 Explanations (June 2006 LSAT) PDF

LSAT PrepTest 48 Explanations (December 2005 LSAT) PDF

LSAT PrepTest 47 Explanations (October 2005 LSAT) PDF

***

Please note:

-In order to benefit from these, you must separately get the related LSAT PrepTests. This download does not include the actual LSAT questions from these exams.

-These are PDFs available for instant download after submitting payment via PayPal. You can use Adobe Reader to open the files.

-If you're already registered with PayPal, the instant download link will be sent to your PayPal email address. Otherwise, it'll be sent to whichever email address you submit.
-Due to the nature of digital downloads, LSAT Blog cannot offer any refunds. All sales are final.


New LSAT PrepTest PDFs Available For Download

LSAT Blog New LSAT PrepTest PDFs DownloadJust wanted to let everyone know that the June 2011 LSAT (LSAT PrepTest 63), and out-of-print LSAT PrepTests 1-6, 8, and 17, are now available for instant PDF download through LSAT Blog!

LSAT PrepTests 39-62 (December 2002 LSAT - December 2010 LSAT) have already been available for download for a while - get them now if you haven't already!

Every exam available for instant PDF download through LSAT Blog comes with free Logical Reasoning explanations for both sections of the exam.

Photo by ericejohnson



LSAT PrepTest Explanation PDFs Available for Instant Download

LSAC doesn't provide explanations for any of the numbered LSAT PrepTests. LSAT PrepTests are just the questions.

If you want to know why a particular answer choice is wrong, you need to get the explanations separately. On LSAT Blog, you can get PDF explanations for LSAT PrepTests by section (LG, LR, and RC):


-Logic Games explanations for the newest PrepTests
-Logic Games explanations for PrepTests 72-81
-Logic Games explanations for PrepTests 62-71
-Logic Games explanations for PrepTests 52-61
-Logic Games explanations for PrepTests 29-38
-Logic Games explanations for PrepTests 19-28

-Logical Reasoning explanations for the newest PrepTests
-Logical Reasoning explanations for PrepTests 72-81
-Logical Reasoning explanations for PrepTests 62-71
-Logical Reasoning explanations for PrepTests 52-61
-Logical Reasoning explanations for PrepTests 44-51
-Logical Reasoning explanations for PrepTests 29-38
-Logical Reasoning explanations for PrepTests 19-28

-Reading Comprehension explanations for the newest PrepTests
-Reading Comprehension explanations for PrepTests 72-81
-Reading Comprehension explanations for PrepTests 62-71
-Reading Comprehension explanations for PrepTests 52-61
-Reading Comprehension explanations for PrepTests 44-51
-Reading Comprehension explanations for PrepTests 29-38
-Reading Comprehension explanations for PrepTests 19-28


LSAT PrepTests

The June 2007 LSAT PDF is the only free LSAT PrepTest PDF available for instant download.

I recommend getting all your other LSAT PrepTests from Amazon. The books of 10 are cheaper than getting them individually (some of the newest are not yet in books of 10, unfortunately).

LSAT PrepTest 80
LSAT PrepTest 79
LSAT PrepTest 78
LSAT PrepTest 77
LSAT PrepTest 76
LSAT PrepTest 75
LSAT PrepTest 74
LSAT PrepTest 73
LSAT PrepTest 72
LSAT PrepTests 62-71
LSAT PrepTests 52-61
LSAT PrepTests 42-51
LSAT PrepTests 29-38
LSAT PrepTests 19-28
LSAT PrepTests 7-18
LSAT SuperPrep (A, B, C)
Official LSAT PT (Feb 1997)



Preparing for the February 2012 LSAT Experimental Section

LSAT Blog February 2012 LSAT Experimental SectionIn my LSAT study schedules, I recommend that you include extra sections in your practice exams. Why would I recommend such a cruel and difficult task?

Because LSAC uses test-takers as lab rats (like many organizations that administer standardized exams - think back to the SAT). LSAC includes an unscored experimental section on the LSAT and doesn't tell you which one it is. If you knew which one it was, you'd probably take a nap to recuperate between the sections you care about - the scored ones.

To LSAC's credit, this practice increases the validity of the scored sections of future LSATs. The experimental section allows LSAC to pre-test questions with several thousand applicants, helping LSAC determine which questions deserve to make it into future scored sections.

On the other hand, not knowing which section is the experimental can make it difficult to decide whether or not to cancel your score. If you bomb the experimental section, it may affect your performance on the other sections. Additionally, being forced to "donate" 35 minutes of free research for LSAC after paying to take the LSAT hardly seems fair.

Regardless, because you'll see a 5-section exam on test day, rather than the 4 you're used to seeing in your LSAT PrepTests, it's essential to prepare.

I decided to write this post after blog reader Katie wrote to me with the following question:
I have been taking 4 section timed tests for a while now but am starting to take 5 and 6 section timed tests as you suggest. I have two questions:

1. I assume that the type of "extra" section(s) I include should vary from test to test. For example, on one day, I would add a logic games section and the next day either a reading comprehension or a logical reasoning section. Is this what you would recommend?

2. What is the best way to score these tests? Which section do I omit? I took a test last night and did an extra logical reasoning section. The scoring for the test I took the extra section from was very different from the full test I was taking - does this make sense? I want to make sure I'm getting an accurate read of my performance.

Varying extra sections
There are two main approaches I'd recommend:

-You can rotate the type of "extra" section(s) that you use.
-You can make the extra section(s) the one that you like the least.

For most people, a combination of the two is probably ideal. Figure out which type of section you dread the most, and include it more often than the others.


Which section to omit
This makes perfect sense, Katie. To get the most accurate score reading, omit the section(s) that are not from the original exam. Different exams have different scales.


Some more tips on preparing for the experimental section:

Where to place the unscored section.
In the past, I recommended that you place the experimental sections in the first 3 sections out of the 5 that you complete for your practice exams. That's where the experimental had traditionally fallen on test day. Until recently, test-takers reported that it had always been one of the first 3 sections.

However, on the October 2011 LSAT, many test-takers reported having the experimental as their 4th section on Test Day - for this reason, I recommend that you also include it as the 4th or 5th section in at least a few practice exams, just in case.

It's unfortunate that you may have to take the unscored section when you're less fatigued, but just remember everyone else is affected in the same way.

Mix up sections.
As I said earlier, on test day, you won't know which section is the experimental. For this reason, you may want to lay out the sections from each PrepTest beforehand. Take two from the "scored" exam and one "unscored" experimental, and mix them together.

This way, you won't know which ones are scored and which ones aren't, and you'll be forced to put the same effort into each.

Photo by happysteve

LSAT PrepTest List

LSAT PrepTest List
This LSAT Blog post is an easy reference to help you determine the number of every PrepTest from the date and year it was administered, and vice-versa, as well as how to get just about every single LSAT PrepTest ever.

The June 2007 LSAT PDF is the only free LSAT PrepTest available for instant download.

I recommend getting all your other LSAT PrepTests from Amazon if you want them in books.

Alternatively, you can get most exams online in the digital format as part of Official LSAT Prep Plus (inside your LSAC account).

LSAT PrepTest List:

LSAT PrepTest 90
LSAT PrepTest 89
LSAT PrepTest 88
LSAT PrepTest 87
LSAT PrepTest 86
LSAT PrepTest 85
LSAT PrepTest 84
LSAT PrepTest 83
LSAT PrepTest 82
LSAT PrepTests 72-81
LSAT PrepTests 62-71
LSAT PrepTests 52-61
LSAT PrepTests 42-51
LSAT PrepTests 29-38
LSAT PrepTests 19-28
LSAT PrepTests 7-18
LSAT SuperPrep (A, B, C)
LSAT SuperPrep 2 (62, 63, and LSAT PrepTest C2)
Official LSAT PrepTest (Feb 1997)
June 2007 LSAT (free PDF)

LSAC doesn't provide explanations for any of the numbered LSAT PrepTests. The PrepTests linked above are just the questions.

So, if you want to know why a particular answer choice is wrong, you need to get the explanations separately.

If you already have LSAT PrepTests and would like explanations, see:


-Logic Games explanations for the newest PrepTests
-Logic Games explanations for PrepTests 72-81
-Logic Games explanations for PrepTests 62-71
-Logic Games explanations for PrepTests 52-61
-Logic Games explanations for PrepTests 29-38
-Logic Games explanations for PrepTests 19-28

-Logical Reasoning explanations for the newest PrepTests
-Logical Reasoning explanations for PrepTests 72-81
-Logical Reasoning explanations for PrepTests 62-71
-Logical Reasoning explanations for PrepTests 52-61
-Logical Reasoning explanations for PrepTests 44-51
-Logical Reasoning explanations for PrepTests 29-38
-Logical Reasoning explanations for PrepTests 19-28

-Reading Comprehension explanations for the newest PrepTests
-Reading Comprehension explanations for PrepTests 72-81
-Reading Comprehension explanations for PrepTests 62-71
-Reading Comprehension explanations for PrepTests 52-61
-Reading Comprehension explanations for PrepTests 44-51
-Reading Comprehension explanations for PrepTests 29-38
-Reading Comprehension explanations for PrepTests 19-28


LSAT PrepTests and explanations alone aren't enough to ensure success on the LSAT. Make sure you also get the best LSAT prep books.

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More info below this huge list.


LSAT PrepTest # - Month / Year - Book

LSAT PrepTest A - February 1996 LSAT - Official LSAT SuperPrep
LSAT PrepTest B - February 1999 LSAT - Official LSAT SuperPrep
LSAT PrepTest C - February 2000 LSAT - Official LSAT SuperPrep
Official LSAT PT - February 1997 LSAT - Official LSAT PrepTest w/ Explanations

LSAT PrepTest 1 - June 1991 LSAT -
LSAT PrepTest 2 - October 1991 LSAT - TriplePrep, Vol. 1, 1, 2
LSAT PrepTest 3 - December 1991
LSAT - TriplePrep, V. 2, 1, 2, 3
LSAT PrepTest 4 - February 1992 LSAT - TriplePrep, Vol. 1
LSAT PrepTest 5 - June 1992
LSAT - TriplePrep, Vol. 1
LSAT PrepTest 6 - October 1992
LSAT - TriplePrep, Vol. 2, 1, 2, 3
LSAT PrepTest 7 - February 1993 LSAT - 10 Actual / LSAT TriplePrep, Vol. 2, alts 1, 2, + 3
LSAT PrepTest 8 - June 1993 LSAT - TriplePrep, Vol. 3 
LSAT PrepTest 9 - October 1993
LSAT - 10 Actual / LSAT TriplePrep, Vol. 3
LSAT PrepTest 10 - February 1994 LSAT - 10 Actual / LSAT TriplePrep, Vol. 3
LSAT PrepTest 11 - June 1994 LSAT - 10 Actual / LSAT TriplePrep Plus with Explanations
LSAT PrepTest 12 - October 1994 LSAT - 10 Actual / LSAT TriplePrep Plus with Explanations
LSAT PrepTest 13 - December 1994 LSAT - 10 Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 14 - February 1995 LSAT - 10 Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 15 - June 1995 LSAT - 10 Actual Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 16 - September 1995 LSAT- 10 Actual Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 17 - December 1995 LSAT -
LSAT PrepTest 18 - December 1992 LSAT- 10 Actual Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 19 - June 1996 LSAT - 10 More Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 20 - October 1996 LSAT - 10 More Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 21 - December 1996 LSAT - 10 More Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 22 - June 1997 LSAT - 10 More Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 23 - October 1997 LSAT - 10 More Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 24 - December 1997 LSAT - 10 More Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 25 - June 1998 LSAT - 10 More Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 26 - September 1998 LSAT - 10 More Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 27 - December 1998 LSAT - 10 More Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 28 - June 1999 LSAT - 10 More Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 29 - October 1999 LSAT - Next 10 Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 30 - December 1999 LSAT - Next 10 Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 31 - June 2000 LSAT - Next 10 Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 32 - October 2000 LSAT - Next 10 Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 33 - December 2000 LSAT - Next 10 Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 34 - June 2001 LSAT - Next 10 Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 35 - October 2001 LSAT - Next 10 Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 36 - December 2001 LSAT - Next 10 Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 37 - June 2002 LSAT - Next 10 Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 38 - October 2002 LSAT - Next 10 Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests
LSAT PrepTest 39 - December 2002 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 40 - June 2003 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 41 - October 2003 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 42 - December 2003 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 43 - June 2004 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 44 - October 2004 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 45 - December 2004 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 46 - June 2005 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 47 - October 2005 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 48 - December 2005 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 49 - June 2006 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 50 - September 2006 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 51 - December 2006 LSAT - Individual 
"LSAT PrepTest 51.5" - June 2007 LSAT - Free LSAT PDF

LSAT PrepTest 52 - September 2007 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 53 - December 2007 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 54 - June 2008 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 55 - October 2008 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 56 - December 2008 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 57 - June 2009 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 58 - September 2009 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 59 - December 2009 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 60 - June 2010 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 61 - October 2010 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 62 - December 2010 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 63 - June 2011 LSAT - Individual

LSAT PrepTest 64 - October 2011 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 65 - December 2011 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 66 - June 2012 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 67 - October 2012 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 68 - December 2012 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 69 - June 2013 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 70 - October 2013 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 71 - December 2013 LSAT - Individual (+ free from LSAC)
LSAT PrepTest 72 - June 2014 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 73 - September 2014 LSAT - Individual (+ free from LSAC)
LSAT PrepTest 74 - December 2014 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 75 - June 2015 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 76 - October 2015 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 77 - December 2015 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest C2 - January 2016 LSAT - SuperPrep 2
LSAT PrepTest 78 - June 2016 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 79 - September 2016 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 80 - December 2016 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 81 - June 2017 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 82 - September 2017 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 83 - December 2017 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 84 - June 2018 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 85 - September 2018 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 86 - November 2018 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 87 - June 2019 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 88 - September 2019 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 89 - November 2019 LSAT - Individual
LSAT PrepTest 90 - August 2020 LSAT - Individual





Among other things, the below contains some details on the various books containing older LSAT PrepTests.

Here's a summarized list of all available LSAT PrepTests:

Numbered PrepTests 1-present

Some of the older PrepTests can be difficult to find, but you can get them in the books below.

Official LSAT TriplePrep, Volume 1 (out-of-print, available used) contains PrepTests 2 (October 1991), 4 (February 1992), and 5 (June 1992). Also try this and this to get it on Amazon.

Official LSAT TriplePrep, Volume 2 (out-of-print, available used) contains PrepTests 3 (December 1991), 6 (October 1992), and 7 (February 1993). Also try thisthis, and this to get it on Amazon.

Official LSAT TriplePrep, Vol.3 (out-of-print, available used) contains PrepTests 8, 9, and 10.

Grouped by Game Type
 contains every Logic Game in PrepTests 1-20.

Grouped by Question Type
 contains every Logical Reasoning question in PrepTests 1-20.

Grouped by Passage Type contains every Reading Comprehension Passage in PrepTests 1-20


Lettered PrepTests

The Official LSAT SuperPrep (PrepTests A, B, and C) = 3
This book contains the previously-undisclosed February 1996, February 1999, and February 2000 exams. It explains all answer choices.

The Official LSAT SuperPrep 2 (PrepTests 62, 63, and C2) = 1
This book contains PrepTest 62, PrepTest 63, and PrepTest C2. It explains all answer choices.


Unnumbered and Unlettered PrepTests

Free Sample June 2007 PrepTest (PDF) = 1

Official LSAT PrepTest With Explanations (out of print - available used) = 1
Fun LSAT trivia: This is the stolen February 1997 LSAT exam with complete explanations written by LSAC.


Free LSAT PrepTests

Free Sample June 2007 PrepTest (PDF) = 1

Digital LSAT PrepTest 71 (in LSAC's Official LSAT Prep) = 1

Digital LSAT PrepTest 73 (in LSAC's Official LSAT Prep) = 1


Photo by alish863psu

LSAT Logic Games Section - Scrap Paper Not Allowed

LSAT Blog Scrap Paper Not Allowed Logic Games Section
UPDATE: For the Digital LSAT, you do get a booklet of scratch paper. It's about 12-14 pages, 8.5 x 11, unlined.

For the paper LSAT (outside North America), you can write on the page itself.

***

A long time ago, I mentioned that there's no scratch paper allowed on the LSAT.

This is a problem for many people when preparing for the Logic Games section. There's often very limited space on the page.

Occasionally, there's almost no space at all.

I recommend getting accustomed to the limitations of the work space fairly early in your prep.

Here are some ideas on how to deal with this:

If you want to preserve your books to redo/resell them, consider:

1. making photocopies (after all, Logic Games are only 4 pages per exam)

2. limiting yourself to a similar amount of space in a notebook. However, start working with the actual free space on the page sooner rather than later. It's a different experience.

3. using pencil and erasing.

4. getting some large post-it notes (something like these or these, depending upon how much space you want to give yourself). Put one at the bottom of the page. You get to simulate what it's like to work within the page's space constraints, but you don't mess up the page itself. No need to erase or photocopy. It also helps you stay organized because your diagrams don't get separated from the games themselves (like they would if you worked separately in a notebook).

This isn't a perfect solution (since there's often plenty of white space next to each question as well). but it's pretty close. Depending upon whether you draw hypotheticals next to particular questions or at the bottom of the page, this may matter to a greater or lesser degree.

Photo by featheredtar / CC BY 2.0

Is LSAT Studying in the Early Morning Good?

LSAT Blog LSAT Studying Early Morning Good
Studying for the LSAT when you first wake up is not a good idea. It doesn't matter whether you wake up in the morning or afternoon.

Why? Because your brain needs time to get out of sleep mode. It's called sleep inertia.

One of my LSAT students emailed me with the following:

I was trying to take your most recent advice to heart: study 2-3 hours a day. One way to do this is to get up early and practice in the morning before work/school.

Any researcher of sleep physiology will tell you that your brain is not fully awake and capable of operating at its optimum capacity until 90 minutes after you have awoken.

More important than the actual preparation is your test day "readiness", one aspect of which is your clarity of thinking. Getting on a schedule where you are used to being up and "fully awake" in the sense described above would be important for your actual performance.

Some of your students most likely are used to sleeping from 12-1-2 am to 7:30-8 am. It would be a terrible mistake to keep this schedule the day, week, even fortnight before the test date. Establishing a schedule that allows your brain to be fully awake at 8 am on LSAT test day will be an important contribution to your performance.

Of course, that last part doesn't apply to all you June test-takers because the June exam starts in the afternoon.

However, even if you're taking the June exam, this still means you shouldn't study when you first wake up in the morning.

Here's an example of research supporting this:

Grogginess, Disorientation On Awakening More Debilitating Than Sleep Deprivation

Excerpts:
The study showed test subjects had diminished short-term memory, counting skills and cognitive abilities during the groggy period upon awakening known as sleep inertia...

For a short period, at least, the effects of sleep inertia may be as bad as or worse than being legally drunk...

The most severe effects of sleep inertia generally dissipated within the first 10 minutes, although its effects are often detectable for up to two hours...

Another study referenced in that link indicates:
[C]ortical areas of the brain like the prefrontal cortex take longer to come "on-line" following sleep than other areas of the brain...The prefrontal cortex is thought to be responsible for problem solving, emotion and complex thought."

So, if you wake up at 7AM, you're probably not going to operate at 100% until close to 9AM. While most of the effects of sleep inertia go away pretty quickly, it's the prefrontal cortex that you really need for your studying.

Problem solving and complex thought sound like LSAT-related tasks to me.

When you first wake up, do other stuff before you start your LSAT studying. Eat breakfast, shower, exercise, check email, etc.

If you do your LSAT studying as soon as you wake up, you're likely to do less than your best. The LSAT can be frustrating enough without sleep inertia - don't make things harder than they have to be.

Photo by fofurasfelinas / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

The Best Answer Choice to Guess on the LSAT

LSAT Blog Best Answer Choice GuessBecause there's no guessing penalty on the LSAT, you should fill in a bubble for every answer.

I recently analyzed the LSAT PrepTest Answer Keys from several different angles.

This blog post contains my findings.

I'll start off with my most-significant findings, which you will find useful.

The rest of the blog post is the data I've analyzed, along with some less-significant findings.

Most of that data isn't too useful, but it's there if you want to look at it and obsess over the details. If you have an amazing memory, you might want to note some of the more specific findings, but the "most significant" ones are probably enough for 99% of people reading this to remember.



Most-Significant Findings

1. Overall, D is most likely to be the correct answer on the LSAT, and E is the least likely to be the correct answer.

Looking at every released PrepTest answer key from June 1991-December 2009, D is 2.1% more likely than E to be the correct answer.

(However, the variation in likelihood of each letter being the correct answer has grown less extreme over time. Looking only at the answer keys for the last 10 years, D is only 1.7% more likely than E, and over the last 5 years, D is only 1.26% more likely than E. That's still a significant-enough difference to be worth knowing, though.)


Take-away:
When guessing randomly between a few choices, if you haven't eliminated D, choose D. Don't choose E when you're down to a few choices and can't decide between them.

If you have to randomly fill in bubbles, choose D.

***
2. In the last 5 answer choices of a given section, D is more likely than others to be the correct answer. A is the least likely.

Take-away:
When guessing randomly on any of the last 5 questions in a section, if you haven't eliminated D, choose it. Whatever you do, don't choose A if guessing randomly.

If you run out of time and have to randomly fill in bubbles, choose D. The probabilities vary depending upon the section type, so feel free to look at the data below if interested in the nitty-gritty.



Answer keys from every released PrepTest, from the past 10 years, and from the past 5 years:

Using answer keys from every released LSAT PrepTest (June 1991-December 2009):


D = 21.2%
B = 20.5%
C = 20.1%
A = 19.2%
E = 19.1%


Using answer keys from every released LSAT PrepTest over the past 10 years (June 2000-December 2009):

D = 21.2%
C = 20%
B = 19.8%
A = 19.6%
E = 19.5%


Using answer keys from every released LSAT PrepTest over the past 5 years (June 2005-December 2009):

D = 20.8%
C = 20.2%
B = 19.8%
A = 19.8%
E = 19.5%



Answer keys by section from every PrepTest, from the past 10 years, and from the past 5 years:

Logic Games

Not too much in the way of useful trends here.

Using Logic Games answer keys from every released LSAT PrepTest (June 1991-December 2009):

B = 20.5%
E = 20.3%
D = 20.1%
C = 19.9%
A = 19.3%


Using Logic Games answer keys from every released LSAT PrepTest over the past 10 years (June 2000-December 2009):

C = 20.6%
A = 20.4%
D = 20.3%
E = 19.5%
B = 19.2%


Using Logic Games answer keys from every released LSAT PrepTest over the past 5 years (June 2005-December 2009):

B = 22.1%
C = 20.9%
E = 19.8%
D = 19.2%
A = 18%



Logical Reasoning

In Logical Reasoning, B and D have consistently been the most likely correct answer choices overall, over the past 10 years, and over the past 5 years.


Using Logical Reasoning answer keys from every released LSAT PrepTest (June 1991-December 2009):


D = 21.6%
B = 20.6%
C = 20.3%
E = 19%
A = 18.6%


Using Logical Reasoning answer keys from every released LSAT PrepTest over the past 10 years (June 2000-December 2009):

B = 21.2%
D = 21.1%
C = 20.1%
E = 19.3%
A = 18.3%


Using Logical Reasoning answer keys from every released LSAT PrepTest over the past 5 years (June 2005-December 2009):

D = 21.2%
B = 20.1%
A = 19.9%
C = 19.7%
E = 19.1%



Reading Comprehension

While D and B have been the most likely answer choices overall in RC, B has shifted to become the least likely answer choice over both the last 10 years and the last 5 years. A has risen to become the second-most common answer choice over this period.


Using Reading Comprehension answer keys from every released LSAT PrepTest (June 1991-December 2009):

D = 21.5%
B = 20.1%
A = 19.9%
C = 19.8%
E = 18.6%


Using Reading Comprehension answer keys from every released LSAT PrepTest over the past 10 years (June 2000-December 2009):

D = 22.3%
A = 21.3%
E = 19.6%
C = 19.1%
B = 17.7%


Using Reading Comprehension answer keys from every released LSAT PrepTest over the past 5 years (June 2005-December 2009):

D = 21.3%
A = 21%
C = 20.3%
E = 20.1%
B = 17.3%


***

Looking at the last 5 answer choices per section:


Using only last 5 answers from every released LSAT PrepTest section (June 1991-December 2009):

D = 22.1%
E = 21.3%
B = 20.2%
C = 18.8%
A = 17.7%



Using only last 5 answers from every released LSAT PrepTest section over the past 10 years (June 2000-December 2009):

D = 21.4%
B = 21.4%
E = 20.4%
C = 19.4%
A = 17.5%


Using only last 5 answers from every released LSAT PrepTest section over the past 5 years (June 2005-December 2009):

B = 22%
D = 21.3%
E = 20%
C = 20%
A = 16.67%



Please note that there is a great deal of fluctuation when looking at the last 5 answer choices per section by section type. This is likely due to the fact that we're working with a very small sample size (in the hundreds, which is very few questions compared to the number of LSAT questions overall - nearly 6,500 in total).

Logic Games

Using only last 5 answers from only the Logic Games section in every released LSAT PrepTest (June 1991-December 2009):

A = 22.5%
D = 20.3%
B = 20.3%
E = 19.4%
C = 17.5%


Using only last 5 answers from only the Logic Games section in every released LSAT PrepTest over the past 10 years (June 2000-December 2009):

D = 22.7%
B = 22%
A = 20.7%
C = 18%
E = 16.7%


Using only last 5 answers from only the Logic Games section in every released LSAT PrepTest over the past 5 years (June 2005-December 2009):

B = 25.3%
D = 24%
E = 20%
C = 16%
A = 14.7%



Logical Reasoning

Using only last 5 answers from only the Logical Reasoning section in every released LSAT PrepTest (June 1991-December 2009):

E = 23.3%
D = 22.7%
B = 19.5%
C = 19.5%
A = 15%


Using only last 5 answers from only the Logical Reasoning section from every released LSAT PrepTest over the past 10 years (June 2000-December 2009):

B = 23.1%
E = 21.7%
C = 21.1%
D = 19.7%
A = 14.4%


Using only last 5 answers from only the Logical Reasoning section every released LSAT PrepTest over the past 5 years (June 2005-December 2009):

C = 22.7%
B = 20.7%
E = 20%
D = 19.3%
A = 19.3%



Reading Comprehension

Using only last 5 answers from only the Reading Comprehension section in every released LSAT PrepTest (June 1991-December 2009):

D = 22.8%
B = 21.3%
E = 19.1%
C = 18.8%
A = 18.1%


Using only last 5 answers from only the Reading Comprehension section in every released LSAT PrepTest over the past 10 years (June 2000-December 2009):

D = 23.3%
E = 21.3%
A = 20.7%
C = 19.3%
B = 19.3%


Using only last 5 answers from only the Reading Comprehension section in every released LSAT PrepTest over the past 5 years (June 2005-December 2009):

D = 22.7%
B = 21.3%
E = 20%
C = 18.7%
A = 17.3%


Percentages may not add to 100% due to rounding.

Photo by johnwardell / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0