Showing posts with label schedule. Show all posts
Showing posts with label schedule. Show all posts

Balancing LSAT Prep with Work and School

LSAT Blog Balancing LSAT Prep with Work and School
Besides learning to solve LSAT questions, one of the most common issues I hear from you is that it's difficult to find the time to study.

A lot of this comes down to starting and maintaining the habits that can help you stay organized and productive.

These include:

-sleep
-diet
-exercise
-stress reduction

I love listening to podcasts, and I just started listening to The 66-Day Experiment podcast. It's all about starting and maintaining habits (iTunes, Stitcher), which is something I know I want to get better at, so I actually subscribed to it.

Relatedly, I talk about daily habits that can help you find the time to study on a recent episode of the Actuarial Journey podcast (iTunes, Stitcher). Although it's a podcast for aspiring actuaries, a lot of the tips I share (and the tips shared in other episodes) apply to anyone studying for an exam.

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If you prefer to read, rather than listen to podcasts, I've written a few articles on habits that can help you balance LSAT prep with other obligations and find the time to study.



You can find more concrete tips in my LSAT study schedules on how to structure your LSAT studying.

LSAT Self-Study Schedules / Plans / Guides

New LSAT self-study schedules (premium day-by-day versions of my free week-by-week LSAT study schedules) are now available for instant download after purchase.

The newest ones I've made available are for 5-month, 6-month, and 7-month study timelines. They're currently arranged for those of you planning to take the June 2011 LSAT.

If you're taking the December 2010 LSAT or February 2011 LSAT, I've already had shorter premium day-by-day versions of my LSAT self-study schedules available for a few weeks now. Get moving!

LSAT Study Schedules That Give You A Plan Of Attack (so you don't waste time on mindless video watching and other distractions)



When I started studying for the LSAT, I didn't know anyone else who'd taken it before.

So here's the "brilliant" way I approached it at first:

>>>> Take a bunch of practice tests.
>>>> Get depressed about my low scores.
>>>> Repeat.


This was my bedroom floor:


Steve's Sucky LSAT Scores



God, I was so stupid.

Taking exam after exam and expecting my scores to improve didn't make much sense - especially when I hadn't really learned the concepts the LSAT tested.

Here's what I SHOULD have done: 

1. Create a plan of attack. 

2. Get the best resources to find out everything I needed to know.

3. Buy a bunch of practice tests. 

4. Follow my plan of attack.

5. Then take a bunch of practice tests (using that plan).

SEE HOW MUCH MORE EFFECTIVE THAT IS???!!!

(Ready to buy? Jump straight to the schedules.)


The problem is, how was I supposed to determine the best plan of attack without knowing anything about the LSAT?

I looked at random blogs and forums, but a lot of the advice I read conflicted with other advice.

After a lot of frustration, sleepless nights, and mindless video watching, something in me finally snapped.

I bought every LSAT book I could find and every practice LSAT ever released. I studied on and off for a year and wasted a lot of time. Eventually, I learned what I needed to know in order to feel comfortable going into the test.

(Oh, and for those wondering, I ENDED UP SCORING A 175!!!)

After I cracked the LSAT code, I started working as a private LSAT instructor. It took me a while to realize this, but it's not enough to show people how to solve specific LSAT questions.

It turns out that knowing EXACTLY what you should be doing is one of the most important things necessary to get a higher LSAT score. 

Having a concrete plan of attack is where it all begins.

I made these schedules because I wished I had a real plan of attack when I was studying. It would've been a LOT easier if I knew exactly how to use all the practice tests and other books.

Not only would I have been able to study a lot more efficiently, but I would have been able to stop procrastinating and finally take the LSAT a lot sooner.

These lay out SPECIFICALLY what to do. They tell you exactly what you need to be doing every single day.


These LSAT study plans are for you:

* if you want to finally start your LSAT studying but are unsure of how to take that first step.

* if you've started studying but lacked the guidance necessary to stick with it.

* if you need a regular schedule to keep you accountable and make sure you are on track.



“Awesome! I’m in! What’s my investment in these LSAT schedules?”

I’m going to be pretty straightforward about how this is priced: My personal philosophy is that when someone buys a schedule from me….the average person should be able to increase their score 5-10 points from it the FIRST MONTH. And 10-15 points from their investment in 2-3 months.


AND THAT HAPPENS ALL THE TIME!


The 1-month, 2-month, 3-month, 4-month, and retake schedules are each $19.97. The 5-month, 6-month, and 7-month schedules are each $24.97. It's a small price to pay for a whole lot of guidance.

Seriously. You probably spend way more than this on Starbucks every month.

Thousands of LSAT students have used these since I first published them. However, I keep them all up-to-date, so they're relevant for anyone studying to take the Digital LSAT in 2020 and beyond.



These schedules literally produce results like these all the time (I've bolded the relevant parts):


"The LSAT Blog has been an invaluable resource. I purchased the day-by-day 3 month LSAT study plan and it was the best money I've ever spent in my life." - Michela F., 148 to 163



"I found that on my second attempt using a day-by-day LSAT study schedule was the most important thing. For the previous exam I had simply given myself tasks that were to be completed by the end of the week. With procrastination kicking in here and there, this method often left me behind on my work...I have seen many speak of a “20 point ceiling”, about how, when it comes to the LSAT you “either have it or you don’t”, but this just isn’t so—and my experience can attest to that." - Dan, 141 to 168 


"I purchased your three month day-by-day schedule and followed it to the best of my ability while working full time. In the end, I managed to increase my score from 148 to 161, above my target score of 160. Your website, blog posts and responsiveness to my questions was absolutely essential to my success. Thank you so much for doing what you do." - Anthony R.


"Steve is a fantastic person and resource for our community, and I want to give him as much good PR as I can. The mere idea that one can avoid a thousand dollar prep course with a $20 study schedule is unreal to me. Actually, the idea that more people don’t take advantage of this is unreal to me." - Ellen C., 174, accepted to Harvard Law



"I started Steve’s 5-month study schedule and within a matter of weeks I was feeling comfortable with linear games...I scored a 158 on my first timed practice test and scored a 172 (99th percentile)...I was just accepted to my dream school, University of Virginia School of Law." - JT

So with such a tiny investment a bunch of these students improved their scores by 10-20 points or more over a few months by following my study schedules. I'd say that's a PRETTY GOOD INVESTMENT!!!

Obviously, these results are on the higher end of the spectrum. Some people like Michela and Dan in the examples above will improve 15-20 points in a few months, and others will improve much less than that.

My goal is that the AVERAGE person ends up with a 5-10 point score increase from following the schedule for one month, and 10-15 points from their investment in 2-3 months because of my help.


This is the insane commitment I want to live up to with my schedules.


And not only that, but they can also help you feel like you're in control of your LSAT studying process, rather than the LSAT controlling YOU.


"These guides would be particularly helpful to those who are also working full-time or part-time while preparing for the LSAT; using one of these schedules could be a great way to make sure you’re staying on track and not losing momentum as the test approaches. No matter your situation, though, these schedules can help you feel more in control of the LSAT prep process -- and that feeling just may be priceless." - Michelle Fabio (law school admission counselor and former About.com Law School Guide)





LSAT Blog Daily LSAT Study Schedules Plans Guides Just choose an LSAT schedule below and you can start immediately:

1-Month (4-Week) Day-By-Day LSAT Study Schedule

2-Month (8-Week) Day-By-Day LSAT Study Schedule

3-Month (12-Week) Day-By-Day LSAT Study Schedule

4-Month (16-Week) Day-By-Day LSAT Study Schedule

5-Month (20-Week) Day-By-Day LSAT Study Schedule

6-Month (24-Week) Day-By-Day LSAT Study Schedule

7-Month (28-Week) Day-By-Day LSAT Study Schedule

Retake Day-By-Day LSAT Study Schedule



They tell you:

- everything you need to do compiled into one big list

- exactly what to do each day, and in what order

- which tests to complete under timed conditions in the middle and end of your prep

- the particular articles to read before attempting certain LSAT questions

- the specific LSAT questions you should solve at a particular point in time


They'll also make sure you're not missing out on some valuable article I've already written that could hold the key to the score you need.

You can spend the next few months reading random blog posts and forums, or you can spend less than $25 to have it professionally explained for you.

Let me save you the trouble of figuring out exactly what to do, so you can just get down to business right away.

Use these schedules to spend less time worrying about whether you're on track, and spend more time studying, sleeping, and maybe even seeing your friends every once in a while.

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LSAT Study Plan Money Back Guarantee
Still not convinced? Keep in mind that I'm offering all LSAT study schedules with a 125% money-back guarantee.

Try the LSAT study plan of your choice without risking a thing. Show me you're doing the exercises and not getting results. If you don't love it, email me within 30 days, and I'll give you a full and complete refund PLUS 25% of what you paid.

You can even keep the study plan at my expense.

I've made these literally risk-free to try.


And if they don't work for you, I'll even give you money as my punishment for having wasted your time.

Why would I offer a guarantee when I don't have to? I can offer this because I've rigorously tested my study plans with thousands of students. I know they work, and I want this to be a no-brainer for you.

(By the way, I ask you to show me you've done the exercises because I know how effective they can be. I don't plan to keep your money if you're dissatisfied, but the only way to get results is to take action. I know you’re busy, but if you can’t commit to at least trying the exercises, then you shouldn’t get one.)

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Answers to Frequently Asked Questions:

-These are PDFs available for instant download after submitting payment via PayPal.

-If you're already registered with PayPal, the download link will be sent to your PayPal email address. Otherwise, it'll be sent to whichever email address you submit.

-The 1-month schedule assumes you're able to intensively study for the LSAT full-time.

-The other schedules all assume you're studying at least 10-15 hours per week. Of course, the more time you put in, the more you’ll get out.

-There are significant differences between the day-by-day schedules and the week-by-week schedules. The day-by-day schedules aren't just the week-by-week schedules divided by 7.

-The longer-term day-by-day schedules include exclusive recommendations not found in the free week-by-week versions, especially on using the older PrepTests effectively. "Catch-up and review weeks" in the free week-by-week versions of the 5-month, 6-month, and 7-month schedules have been replaced in the premium day-by-day versions with recommendations on effectively using older exams.

-I’ve created the retake schedule on a 3-month (12-week) timeline, but you can easily modify it for any time period depending on your specific needs. I include tips on how to do so on the schedule's first page.

-Only use the retake schedule if you've already worked through one of the day-by-day plans. If you've prepped for the LSAT in the past by taking a prep class but haven't used one of the regular day-by-day plans, use the regular day-by-day plan, not the retake day-by-day plan.

- The study schedules include tips on how to use a variety of LSAT books because there are likely differences in the books that each of you already have and/or are willing to get separately. All that's truly necessary in order to benefit from this schedule are actual LSAT PrepTests, which must be purchased separately. (However, you can easily find affordable copies on Amazon.) I do strongly recommend that you consider at least some of the other books, depending upon your particular needs. Also, while you can certainly substitute other LSAT PrepTests for the ones listed in the schedules, it would be to your advantage to complete the newest exams before taking the LSAT itself.

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Remember, these are 100% risk-free. That means you can try one, then decide if it's right for you. If you don't love it, just show me you did the work, and I'll refund 125% of your money. But I'm confident these will help you improve your LSAT score and get into the law school of your dreams.


The 1-month, 2-month, 3-month, 4-month, and retake schedules are only $19.97, and the 5-month, 6-month, and 7-month schedules are only $24.97.

It’s weird how people will spend $60 on drinks at a bar, but won’t buy a book for less than half that amount that can change their life.

If you think my price is fair, and the timing is right for you to start studying for the LSAT, then choose a schedule to get started. I'll immediately send it you via email.


Choose a schedule:


1-Month (4-Week) Day-By-Day LSAT Study Schedule

2-Month (8-Week) Day-By-Day LSAT Study Schedule

3-Month (12-Week) Day-By-Day LSAT Study Schedule

4-Month (16-Week) Day-By-Day LSAT Study Schedule

5-Month (20-Week) Day-By-Day LSAT Study Schedule

6-Month (24-Week) Day-By-Day LSAT Study Schedule

7-Month (28-Week) Day-By-Day LSAT Study Schedule

Retake Day-By-Day LSAT Study Schedule



"The 3-month LSAT schedule provided by Steve went up on the wall. My first PrepTest was a 150 with each timed full test, I was pleased to see my scores rising until I pulled a 172...UPDATE: I got my LSAT score yesterday and was thrilled to find out that I got a 175. I really want to thank you for all the information you put on your blog and for offering the 3-month-study schedule that I followed. There's not enough I can say to thank you." - Lisa, improved from 150 to 175


P.S. The day-by-day study schedule when used as part of an LSAT course package is a lethal combination. (You'll get it automatically with any course package.)


P.P.S. I honestly don't know anyone else who offers a 125% money-back guarantee on their stuff. You might think I'm crazy for doing it, but I believe most people are good and won't try to take advantage. (No one's tried to cash in on it yet.)


P.P.P.S. If you're NOT ready to start your LSAT prep...then please don't buy.



LSAT Prep Reading Comp Tips

This LSAT Blog post lists all my Reading Comprehension-related blog posts.

I've listed them below in two separate groups and included a link to the categorization of Reading Comprehension passages from every LSAT PrepTest.

This is all meant to accompany the initial Reading Comprehension portion of my LSAT study schedules, in order to give you more specific guidance on where to find each Reading Comprehension blog post.

LSAT Prep While Working or in College

LSAT Prep While Working CollegeIf you have a busy schedule with work or school and a halfway-decent social life, it’s difficult enough to manage everything. Add in LSAT prep, and it's easy to feel overwhelmed.

For this reason, start studying for the LSAT earlier than you think you'll need to.

Your elementary school book reports probably took longer than you'd thought they would, due to both procrastination and underestimation of the project's enormity.

Same goes for LSAT prep.

It's a more difficult exam than those you took to get into undergrad, and it has higher stakes.

Because you likely have more to do now than when you were in high school, you really can't afford to procrastinate.

Give yourself extra time to prepare. I recommend a minimum of 3 months, but 4 months wouldn't be a bad idea if you want to give yourself a bit of a cushion.

The busier you are with work or school, the greater the number of months you'll need. This won't necessarily mean you'll be studying for a greater number of hours, of course. It simply means that you'll have to spread out your studying.

This is a good thing. You shouldn't cram your studying all at once anyway. The LSAT is not about memorizing material. Rather, it's about refining your thought processes to think more logically.

The more spread out your studying is, and the greater the number of months that you're thinking about this, the more you'll learn the LSAT mindset of skepticism, analysis, and improve your ability to interpret convoluted text.


The following are just some general suggestions for how and when to study. Of course, you'll have to adjust them for your specific needs, and your actual studying will vary week by week.


If you work full-time or go to school full-time, 15 hours per week of LSAT studying over the course of 4 months might be a good guideline.

Here's how you might fit it in over the course of the week:

-5 hours on Saturday
-2.5 hours per day, Mon-Thurs
-0 hours on Friday
-0 hours on Sunday


If you work part-time or go to school part-time, 20 hours per week of LSAT studying over the course of 3 months might be a good guideline.

Here's how you might fit it in over the course of the week:

-5 hours on Saturday
-3.75 hours per day, Mon-Thurs
-0 hours on Friday
-0 hours on Sunday


If you work full-time, you'll probably have a harder time fitting in your studying because you'll have less unscheduled (free) time.

Here's how you might fit in 2.5 hours on a weekday:

-.5 hours before starting the workday (may require getting to the office early)
-.5 hours during lunch
-1.5 hours



Now, I know 5 hours of LSAT studying is not your ideal way to spend a Saturday. Aside from killing a good chunk of a weekend day, it'll probably tame your Friday nights a bit.

(If it doesn't on the first Friday night you party while prepping, it certainly will on the second. You'll realize that the correlation between Friday night partying and Saturday morning hangovers may, in fact, be of a causal nature as well.)

However, the studying has to happen sometime. Unless you want to fit even more study time into your weekdays, or you want to study on both weekend days, 5 hours of studying will have to happen on one weekend day. (I'm not necessarily saying it's better to load your weekend studying onto one day, just that you may prefer it. Modify as desired.)

So, how do you study 5 hours on a weekend day?

First of all, waking up early is probably the way to go. This gives you the late afternoon/early evening to spend with family or friends.

However, don't study as soon as you get out of bed. It takes your brain up to 2 hours to fully wake up in the morning, so do other stuff before starting your studying for the day.

Here's how you might study for 5 hours on a weekend day:

8AM-10AM: wake up, brush teeth, eat breakfast, shower, exercise, check email/Facebook/news, etc.
10AM-12:30PM: study LSAT
12:30-1:15PM: lunch
1:15-3:45PM: study LSAT
3:45PM-???: fun stuff

Feel free to shift it all 2 hours later if you're on a different sleep schedule. Remember, though, that you're not supposed to party the night before.



If you're in school, you probably have a great deal of unscheduled (free) time, during which you have several things to do at undefined points during the week:

-Facebook
-Friends
-Extracurriculars
-Internship
-Job
-Exercise

Then, of course, there's class, which is at a defined point during the week. That (supposedly) makes you more likely to go each week because you know exactly when it is. It's scheduled in your planner/calendar.

I don't care whether you miss class sometimes. Professors ramble, and you can probably get a good GPA without going too often.

However, I do care whether you study for the LSAT.

If there are specific times each week that you're supposed to study, you're more likely to actually study. At the very least, it may make you feel guilty for doing other stuff during that time.

Guilt is a great motivator.

Since your classes aren't necessarily at the same time each day, the LSAT studying doesn't have to be at the same time every day either.

However, you should still treat it like a class (or two). It might be a good idea to take this into account when planning your classes and other responsibilities during the semester. If the norm at your school is taking 4 or 5 classes a semester, consider taking 3 or 4 classes during your LSAT prep semester instead. Consider not doing an internship that semester. There's a good chance you'll need the time.


Summary:

-Start your prep earlier than you think is necessary.

-Set aside specific times to study each day.

-Try to spread your studying throughout the week.

-Give yourself at least one or two days off from studying per week.

-Try to reduce other obligations during the period that you'll be prepping.

Photo by jackol

7-Month LSAT Study Guide / Schedule

7 months is more than enough time if you stick with a regular, but moderate, schedule. I've reviewed all books and PrepTests mentioned below in my best LSAT prep books post.

This 28-week schedule is intense. Follow it only if you're studying for the LSAT full-time, or if you're able to study for several hours each weekend. You might have work/school/life obligations that make this impossible. If that's the case, skip some of the "re-do" and "review" weeks, and complete the rest at a more relaxed pace.

Month 1:



Review my relevant articles on Logic Games and complete this list of Logic Games from PrepTests 52-61 ordered by difficulty during the first 4 weeks, untimed.

Week 1: Complete Pure Sequencing, Basic Linear, and Advanced Linear games. Review each game that gives you trouble.

Week 2: Complete Grouping: In-Out / Selection, Grouping: Splitting, and Grouping: Matching games. Review each game that gives you trouble.

Week 3: Complete Combination games.

Week 4: Complete any Logic Games in older exams of the types that give you difficulty. Complete a few timed sections of Logic Games. Review.


Month 2:

Week 5: Read A Rulebook For Arguments and complete a few more timed sections of Logic Games. Review.

Week 6: Review my articles on Logical Reasoning before completing LSAT questions of each type in PrepTests 52-61 using the LSAT Logical Reasoning spreadsheet (untimed). Complete a few timed sections of Logic Games.

Week 7: Continue Logical Reasoning work from Week 6 with additional question-types and complete a few timed sections of Logic Games.

Week 8: Continue Logical Reasoning work from Week 6 with additional question-types and complete a few timed sections of Logic Games.


Month 3:

Week 9: A brief return to Logic Games: Complete any Logic Games in older exams of the types that give you difficulty (untimed), then complete several timed sections of Logic Games. Review. Complete a few timed sections of Logical Reasoning.

Week 10: Complete Logical Reasoning work from Week 6 with additional question-types and complete a few timed sections of Logic Games.

Week 11: Complete several timed sections of Logical Reasoning from PrepTests 19-28. Review. Also complete some timed sections of Logic Games.

Week 12: Read my articles on Reading Comprehension and complete several sections of Reading Comp from PrepTests 52-61 (untimed). Complete a few timed sections of Logic Games, Logical Reasoning, and Reading Comprehension.


Month 4:

Week 13: Complete several timed sections of Reading Comp from older exams. Review. Also complete some timed sections of LG and LR.

Week 14: Catch-up and review week. Re-do the Linear / Sequencing games from PrepTests 52-61. Try to solve them more quickly and make new inferences. Complete timed sections of all types.

Week 15: A brief return to Logical Reasoning: Complete any Logical Reasoning questions in older exams of the types that give you difficulty (untimed), then complete several timed sections of Logical Reasoning. Review. Complete timed sections of all types.

Week 16: Catch-up and review week. Re-do the Grouping and Combination games from PrepTests 52-61. Try to solve them more quickly and make new inferences. Complete timed sections of all types.


Month 5:

Week 17: Catch-up and review week. Re-do the Logical Reasoning questions from PrepTests 52-61 that gave you trouble. Complete timed sections of all types.

Week 18: Complete the 3 tests in LSAC's SuperPrep (timed) and review the explanations. Although the explanations are technical, it's good to learn how the test-makers think. Identify weak areas.

Week 19: Re-read my articles on Logic Games, Logical Reasoning, and Reading Comprehension about question-types still giving you trouble.

Week 20: Use my Logic Games categorization to do question-types in older exams that still give you difficulty. Review. Complete some timed sections of LR and RC.


Month 6:

Week 21: Use the Logical Reasoning spreadsheet to do question-types in older exams that still give you difficulty. Review. Complete some timed sections of LG and RC.

Week 22: Do Reading Comp passages about your least-favorite topics in older exams using my Reading Comp passages categorization. Complete a recent LSAT PrepTest under timed conditions. Review.

Week 23: Complete a few timed sections of Logic Games, Logical Reasoning, and Reading Comp, and review. Complete a recent LSAT PrepTest under timed conditions. Review.

Week 24: For the remaining weeks, use these free Logic Games Explanations, these video explanations, and these other LSAT explanations after completing the relevant exam.

Complete 3 recent LSAT PrepTests under timed conditions as 4-section exams. Review each exam on alternating days.


Month 7:

Week 25: Complete 3 recent LSAT PrepTests (timed). Splice in sections from another to simulate experimental sections. Review each exam on alternating days.

Week 26: Complete 3 recent LSAT PrepTests (timed). Splice in sections from another to simulate experimental sections. Consider using one section to create a 6-section exam for extra practice. Review each exam on alternating days.

Week 27: Complete 3 recent LSAT PrepTests (timed). Splice in sections from another to simulate experimental sections. (Again, consider using one section to create a 6-section exam). Review each exam on alternating days.

Week 28:  Complete 3 recent LSAT PrepTests (timed). Splice in sections from another to simulate experimental sections. (Again, consider using one section to create a 6-section exam). Review each exam on alternating days. More thoughts on how to simulate the experimental section in this article.



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Also check out my other sample LSAT study schedules and plans.

LSAT Prep: Logical Reasoning Tips

LSAT Prep Logical Reasoning TipsThis LSAT Blog post lists all the Logical Reasoning-related blog posts you should read toward the beginning of your prep.

I've listed them in the specific order in which you should read them, along with a link to the categorization of Logical Reasoning questions you should complete from the Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests.

Here are complete explanations for Logical Reasoning questions in those PrepTests.

This is all meant to accompany the initial Logical Reasoning portion of my LSAT study schedules, in order to give you more specific guidance on when to read each Logical Reasoning blog post.

Enjoy!


Topics
Get a sense of what sorts of topics are covered in LSAT Logical Reasoning:
15 Common LSAT Logical Reasoning Topics

(And just for fun...25 Future LSAT Logical Reasoning Topics)


Before, or during, your LSAT Logical Reasoning prep:
Real Life Logic Examples


Vocabulary
Improve your vocabulary and understanding of words used in the Logical Reasoning section:
LSAT Logical Reasoning Vocabulary Words

LSAT Words: "Except" "unless" "until" and "without" mean...

LSAT Numbers: All, Most, Several, Many, Some, None


Sufficient and Necessary Conditions
Learn the difference between them:
Words Indicating Sufficient / Necessary Conditions, and Time

LSAT Logic | Necessary vs Sufficient Conditions

Logical Reasoning: Necessary and Sufficient Conditions


Formal vs. Informal Logic
Get a sense of the difference between formal and informal logic:
Formal vs. Informal Logic in Logical Reasoning


LR Categorization by PrepTest
Use the following spreadsheet (and/or list at the end of that blog post) to identify questions of various types:
LSAT Logical Reasoning Spreadsheet


LR Question Types
Before completing Must Be True Questions:
Logical Reasoning | Formal Logic Inference Questions

Logical Reasoning: Inference Questions and the Contrapositive


Before completing Most Strongly Supported Questions:
Most Strongly Supported Logical Reasoning Questions


Before completing Necessary Assumption Questions:
Necessary Assumption Questions, Negation Test, and Must Be True Qs

Difference Between Necessary & Sufficient Assumption Questions

Arguments and Contrapositives | Necessary and Sufficient Assumptions


Before completing Sufficient Assumption Questions:
Logical Reasoning | Sufficient Assumption (Justify) Questions

Sufficient Assumption Questions | Tips and Categorization

Sufficient Assumption Questions and the Negation Test


Before completing Strengthen Questions:
5 Steps to Solving Strengthen Logical Reasoning Questions


Before completing Weaken Questions:
5 Steps to Solving Weaken Logical Reasoning Questions


Before completing Parallel Reasoning / Parallel Flaw Questions:
Logical Reasoning: Parallel and Parallel Flaw Questions



After learning about the various question-types:

LSAT Logical Reasoning Question Types: A New Approach


Necessary Assumption Question: The Rattlesnake Folktale

Negating Conditional Statements in Logical Reasoning




Miscellaneous (Simple):

7 Logical Reasoning Tips and Tricks

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love LSAT Logical Reasoning

How to Ace LSAT Logical Reasoning | 7 Habits

Conditional Reasoning: Contrapositive, Mistaken Reversal, Mistaken Negation

The Logic of Real Arguments by Alec Fisher | Excerpt


Miscellaneous (Complex):

LSAT Logic: Neither Necessary Nor Sufficient

LSAT Logical Reasoning Flaw Questions with the Same Argument

2 Tough LSAT Logical Reasoning Flaw Questions

5 Hardest LSAT Logical Reasoning Questions, Explained

Sample LSAT Logical Reasoning Questions

Photo by telstar

LSAT Prep Study Plan: Logic Games Schedule

LSAT Prep Study Plan Logic Games ScheduleThis page lists all the Logic Games articles you should read toward the beginning of your prep.

I've listed them in the specific order in which you should read them, along with the relevant Logic Games you should complete from The Next 10 Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests.

Use my LSAT Logic Games Cheat Sheet as a quick-reference, and you can use my Logic Games Guide and Mastering Logic Games for extra LG guidance and a focus on question-solving strategies.

Also consider doing some sudoku puzzles. They're a nice break from actual LSAT Logic Games, but they still allow you to practice LSAT-style deductions. This game is good, too.

This is all meant to accompany the initial Logic Games portion of my LSAT study schedules, while giving you more specific guidance on when to read which blog post and when to do each Logic Game.

Enjoy!



Read the following before starting LSAT Logic Games:

Learn about (the lack of) scratch paper in Logic Games:

Scratch Paper on LSAT Logic Games?

LSAT Logic Games Section - Scrap Paper Not Allowed


Learn some Logic Games vocabulary and conditional indicator words:

LSAT Logic Games Vocabulary Words and Phrases


LSAT Words: "Except" "unless" "until" and "without" mean...

LSAT Logic | Necessary vs Sufficient Conditions


General tips on approaching the Logic Games section:

How I Learned to Love LSAT Logic Games

How to Ace LSAT Logic Games | 7 Habits

5 Reasons I Secretly Enjoy Logic Games


Starting LSAT Logic Games

The following lists of games are taken from my Logic Games categorization. Read the categorization in order to understand what the different categories mean.

Along the lines of what I recommend in my more popular LSAT study schedules, I'm including every game from PrepTests 29-38 (and no others). I've presented the games in a rough order of difficulty within each of the categories. All page numbers are from the newer edition of The Next 10 Actual, Official LSAT PrepTests. (If you're using the older edition, subtract 8 from each page # below.)

Feel free to complete more games from the Logic Games categorization if you want more practice.

(I refer to PrepTests by # rather than date. If your materials refer to them by date, use LSAT PrepTests and Dates Administered to translate dates into #s.)

(Please note: For any of the free Logic Games on the blog, you can also download them as one big free LSAT Logic Games PDF.)


Relative Ordering/Sequencing (aka Pure Sequencing)

Complete my Free LSAT Logic Game | Pure Sequencing, then read this step-by-step explanation and this other explanation (Logic Games Pure Sequencing Diagram | Explanation).

Complete the following Pure Sequencing Logic Games, in this order:

PrepTest 38, Game 1 - p. 330
PrepTest 33, Game 1 - p. 176
PrepTest 29, Game 3 - p. 34
PrepTest 29, Game 4 - p. 35


Strict Ordering/Sequencing (aka Basic Linear)

Complete my Basic Linear Logic Game (this: Free LSAT Logic Games | Linear | Easy Version and/or this: Free LSAT Logic Games | Linear | Difficult Version), then read this step-by-step explanation for it.

Then read:

Logic Game | Basic and Advanced Linear | Limited Options


Then complete the following Basic Linear Logic Games, in this order:

PrepTest 30, Game 4 - p. 53
PrepTest 34, Game 3 - p. 212
PrepTest 31, Game 3 - p. 86
PrepTest 34, Game 2 - p. 211
PrepTest 35, Game 4 - p. 239
PrepTest 34, Game 1 - p. 210
PrepTest 37, Game 4 - p. 307
PrepTest 32, Game 3 - p. 136


Multi-level Ordering/Sequencing (aka Advanced Linear)

Complete the following Advanced Linear Logic Games, in this order:

PrepTest 36, Game 4 - p. 281
PrepTest 37, Game 2 - p. 305
PrepTest 32, Game 4 - p. 137
PrepTest 36, Game 2 - p. 279
PrepTest 38, Game 2 - p. 331
PrepTest 30, Game 3 - p. 52
PrepTest 31, Game 1 - p. 84
PrepTest 35, Game 3 - p. 238
PrepTest 38, Game 4 - p. 333
PrepTest 36, Game 3 - p. 280 (very difficult)

Then complete my Free LSAT Logic Game | Advanced Linear, and read the explanation.


Grouping: Selection / In-Out

Learn about formal logic in Logic Games:

Conditional Reasoning: Contrapositive, Mistaken Reversal, Mistaken Negation

Logic Games Tips | Conditional Reasoning


Then complete the following Grouping: In-Out / Selection Logic Games, in this order:

PrepTest 33, Game 2 - p. 177 (LSAT Logic Game Explanation: Birds in the Forest | Selection)

Then complete my Free LSAT Logic Game | Grouping: Selection / In-Out, then read my Logic Games Selection | In-Out Diagram Explanation.

PrepTest 36, Game 1 - p. 278
PrepTest 31, Game 2 - p. 85 (very difficult)


The following two are Grouping: In-Out / Selection Logic Games that are different, and easier than, from the ones above.

PrepTest 30, Game 1 - p. 50
PrepTest 35, Game 1 - p. 236


Then complete my Free LSAT Logic Games | Grouping: Selection (Defined), read my Logic Game | Grouping: Selection (Defined) Diagram | Explanation.

Then complete the following two games, both of which have numerical distribution elements:

PrepTest 33, Game 3 - p. 178
PrepTest 32, Game 2 - p. 135

(I've placed PT33, Game 3 first because it's more similar to the game that I've written.)


Grouping: Splitting

Complete my Free LSAT Logic Game | Grouping: Splitting, then read the explanation (LSAT Logic Game Explanation | Grouping: Splitting).

Then complete the following Grouping: Splitting Logic Games, in this order:

PrepTest 29, Game 1 - p. 32
PrepTest 34, Game 4 - p. 213 (very difficult)


Grouping: Matching

Then complete the following Grouping: Matching Logic Games, in this order:

PrepTest 37, Game 1 - p. 304
PrepTest 33, Game 4 - p. 179
PrepTest 38, Game 3 - p. 332
PrepTest 37, Game 3 - p. 306 (very difficult)

Then complete my Free LSAT Logic Games | Grouping: Matching | Templates, then read my Logic Game Grouping: Matching Templates Diagram | Explanation.


Then complete the following Grouping: Matching Logic Game:

PrepTest 35, Game 2 - p. 237

Then complete Free LSAT Logic Game | Grouping: Matching, then read my Logic Games Matching Diagram | Explanation.


Combination

Finally, test your skills by completing the following games that combine elements of different game types:

Grouping: In-and-Out / Grouping: Matching
PrepTest 29, Game 2 - p. 33 (very difficult)

Ordering / Grouping: In-and-Out / Grouping: Matching
PrepTest 31, Game 4 - p. 87

Ordering / Grouping: In-and-Out
PrepTest 32, Game 1 - p. 134
PrepTest 30, Game 2 - p. 51



In between doing everything above, or afterward, check out these lists of Logic Games:

10 Hardest LSAT Logic Games

7 LSAT Logic Games Repeated on Future PrepTests

LSAT Logic Games Practice | 7 Games To Do Before Test Day


After doing everything above, check out my explanations for some recent Logic Games:

LSAT PrepTest Explanations for Logic Games



***

A note on a potential source of confusion

In some cases, I've suggested that you complete the relevant game I've written before you do actual LSAT Logic Games of that type.

In other cases, I've suggested you complete my game after completing at least one actual LSAT Logic Game of the relevant type.

This may lead you to wonder why.

When I initially wrote my own LSAT Logic Games, I intended for most of them to be more difficult than the average LSAT Logic Game.

However, you probably won't want your first game of a particular type to be difficult, so I've placed my tough games a bit later in the list of relevant Logic Games to complete. (For the most part, the placement of my games within the list of games to complete reflects their relative difficulty.)

I've also made available written explanations for actual LSAT Logic Games of each type so you have some guidance as you begin your study of each game type.


Photo by wyrmworld

LSAT Retake Study Schedule / Plan: Intense Version

Also see the Retake LSAT Study Schedule: Premium Day-By-Day Version.

I originally created the following 3-month LSAT study schedule for a student of mine. This student is preparing for an LSAT retake, has the goal of 170+, and is able to study for the LSAT full-time from now until Test Day.

If you're not preparing for a retake, use one of the other  LSAT study schedules.

If you're preparing for a retake but can't study full-time, also check out this 3-month LSAT study schedule.

Anyway, if you're:

-retaking

-can study full-time for the 3-month period leading up to Test Day (at least 4-5 hours on most days)

-have the desire to work hard (which is a good idea if you struggle a lot with this stuff and/or want a top score)

the following schedule is a good guideline for you.

Most people (as well as the student I made this schedule for) tend to struggle less with Reading Comp than with the other sections. As such, I've left out RC-specific prep for the earlier portion of the schedule, but you'll be doing a couple dozen exams worth of RC, anyway, so that should be enough.

Aside from that, this schedule will allow you to cover nearly every single LSAT PrepTest's Logic Games and Logical Reasoning questions. It's super-intense but doesn't include the older RC passages, so, as always, feel free to modify as necessary.


If you didn't study properly the first time around, you may want to make some kind of hybrid of the following and one of the original 3-month LSAT study schedules (not for retakers). This one's for people who have already done a good portion of that work.

Without further ado....

The 3-Month LSAT Retake Study Schedule / Plan: Intense Version


Relevant links:

LR Categorizations

LR Analysis Example

LG Categorization for PrepTests 19-38
LG Categorization for PrepTests 39-present


Recommended Books:

See a list of recommended books in Best LSAT Prep Books.



Week 1:

Do every LG from several older PrepTests by type at least twice using my categorization. If you have already used many of the released LSAT exams, you can work out of older PrepTests by using Grouped by Game Type.

Do each game until it makes perfect sense and you're able to solve it efficiently (within a reasonable period of time and inferences/questions flow naturally).


Week 2:

Do every Logical Reasoning question from several older PrepTests by type using the categorization. If you have already used many of the released LSAT exams, you can work out of the older PrepTests by using Grouped by Question Type.

Mark off any questions you answer incorrectly or have trouble on and analyze them in depth. Write out WHY the correct answer is correct and why the incorrect answers (esp. the one you chose) are wrong.


Week 3:

Do Logic Games from several older PrepTests by type using my categorization.

Do each game until it makes perfect sense and you're able to solve it efficiently (within a reasonable period of time and inferences/questions flow naturally).


Week 4:

Do Logical Reasoning questions from several older exams by type using the categorization.

Mark off any questions you answer incorrectly or have trouble on and analyze them in depth. Write out WHY the correct answer is correct and why the incorrect answers (esp. the one you chose) are wrong.


Week 5:

Do Logic Games from several older PrepTests by type using my categorization.

Do each game until it makes perfect sense and you're able to solve it efficiently (within a reasonable period of time and inferences/questions flow naturally).

Do two older PrepTests as full-length timed 4-section exams. Review any questions you answer incorrectly or have trouble on and analyze them in depth. Write out WHY the correct answer is correct and why the incorrect answers (esp. the one you chose) are wrong. Also read the LSAT explanations for the sections that give you trouble.


Week 6:

Do Logical Reasoning questions from several older exams by type using the categorization.

Mark off any questions you answer incorrectly or have trouble on and analyze them in depth. Write out WHY the correct answer is correct and why the incorrect answers (esp. the one you chose) are wrong.

Do two older PrepTests as full-length timed 4-section exams. Review any questions you answer incorrectly or have trouble on and analyze them in depth. Write out WHY the correct answer is correct and why the incorrect answers (esp. the one you chose) are wrong. Also read LSAC's explanations for these questions.

Do a single older PrepTest as a full-length timed 4-section exam. Review, etc.

Week 7:

Do Logic Games from several older PrepTests by type using my categorization.

Do each game until it makes perfect sense and you're able to solve it efficiently (within a reasonable period of time and inferences/questions flow naturally).

Do two older PrepTests as full-length timed 4-section exams. Review, etc.


Week 8:

Do Logical Reasoning questions from several older exams by type using the categorization.

Mark off any questions you answer incorrectly or have trouble on and analyze them in depth. Write out WHY the correct answer is correct and why the incorrect answers (esp. the one you chose) are wrong.

Do two PrepTests as full-length timed exams with Reading Comp sections from other exams inserted to simulate experimental sections. Review, etc.

For the remaining weeks, study each of these Logic Games Explanations after completing the relevant exam.


Week 9: Complete 3 recent LSAT PrepTests (timed). Splice in sections from another to simulate the experimental section. Review all wrong answers and write out explanations for them. Consider using one section to create a 6-section exam for extra practice. Review each exam on alternating days.


Week 10: Complete 3 recent LSAT PrepTests (timed). Splice in sections from another to simulate the experimental section. Review all wrong answers and write out explanations for them. Consider using one section to create a 6-section exam for extra practice. Review each exam on alternating days.


Week 11: Complete 3 recent LSAT PrepTests (timed). Splice in sections from another to simulate the experimental section. Review all wrong answers and write out explanations for them. Consider using one section to create a 6-section exam for extra practice. Review each exam on alternating days.


Week 12: Complete 3 recent LSAT PrepTests (timed). Splice in sections from another to simulate the experimental section. Review all wrong answers and write out explanations for them. Consider using one section to create a 6-section exam for extra practice. Review each exam on alternating days.



5-Month LSAT Study Guide / Plan

Also see the 5-Month LSAT Study Schedule: Premium Day-By-Day Version.

5 months is PLENTY of time if you stick with a regular, but moderate, schedule. I've reviewed all books and PrepTests mentioned below in my best LSAT prep books post.

This schedule is intense. Follow it only if you're studying for the LSAT full-time, or if you're able to study for several hours each weekend. You might have work/school/life obligations that make this impossible. If that's the case, skip some of the "re-do" and "review" weeks, and complete the rest at a more relaxed pace.

Month 1:
Review my relevant articles on Logic Games and complete this list of Logic Games from PrepTests 52-61 ordered by difficulty during the first 4 weeks.

Week 1: Complete Pure Sequencing, Basic Linear, and Advanced Linear games. Review each game that gives you trouble.

Week 2: Complete Grouping: In-Out / Selection, Grouping: Splitting, and Grouping: Matching games. Review each game that gives you trouble.

Week 3: Complete Combination games in PrepTests 52-61 (untimed).

Week 4: Complete several timed sections of Logic Games from older exams, and read A Rulebook For Arguments.


Month 2:
Week 5: Review my articles on Logical Reasoning before completing LSAT questions of each type in PrepTests 52-61 using the LSAT Logical Reasoning spreadsheet (untimed). Complete a few timed sections of Logic Games.

Week 6: Continue Logical Reasoning work from Week 4 with additional question-types and complete a few timed sections of Logic Games.

Week 7: Continue Logical Reasoning work from Week 4 with additional question-types and complete a few timed sections of Logic Games and Logical Reasoning.

Week 8: Continue Logical Reasoning work from Week 4 with additional question-types and complete a few timed sections of Logic Games and Logical Reasoning.


Month 3:
Week 9: Read my articles on Reading Comprehension and complete several sections of Reading Comp from PrepTests 52-61 (untimed). Complete a few timed sections of Logic Games, Logical Reasoning, and Reading Comprehension.

Week 10: Catch-up and review week. Re-do the Linear / Sequencing games from PrepTests 52-61. Try to solve them more quickly and make new inferences. Complete timed sections of all types.

Week 11: Catch-up and review week. Re-do the Grouping and Combination games from PrepTests 52-61. Try to solve them more quickly and make new inferences. Complete timed sections of all types.

Week 12: Catch-up and review week. Re-do the Logical Reasoning questions from PrepTests 52-61 that gave you trouble. Complete timed sections of all types.


Month 4:
Week 13: Complete the 3 tests in LSAC's SuperPrep (timed) and review the explanations. Although the explanations are really technical, it's good to learn how the test-makers think. Identify weak areas.

Week 14: Re-read my articles on Logic Games and Logical Reasoning about question-types still giving you trouble. Complete a recent LSAT PrepTest under timed conditions. Review.

Week 15: Use my Logic Games categorization and/or Logical Reasoning spreadsheet to do question-types in older exams that still give you difficulty. Review. Complete another LSAT PrepTest under timed conditions. Review.

Week 16: Complete 3 recent LSAT PrepTests under timed conditions as 4-section exams. Review each exam on alternating days.


Month 5:
Week 17: Complete 3 recent LSAT PrepTests (timed). Splice in sections from another to simulate experimental sections. Review each exam on alternating days.

For the remaining weeks, use these free Logic Games Explanations, these video explanations, and these other LSAT explanations after completing the relevant exam.

Week 18: Complete 3 recent LSAT PrepTests (timed). Splice in sections from another to simulate experimental sections. Review each exam on alternating days.

Week 19: Complete 3 recent LSAT PrepTests (timed). Splice in sections from another to simulate experimental sections. Consider using one section to create a 6-section exam for extra practice. Review each exam on alternating days.

Week 20: Complete 3 recent LSAT PrepTests (timed). Splice in sections from another to simulate experimental sections. (Again, consider using one section to create a 6-section exam). More thoughts on how to simulate the experimental section in this article. Review each exam on alternating days.

Finally, rock the LSAT on Test Day.