LSAT Retake Study Schedule / Plan: Intense Version

Also see the Retake LSAT Study Schedule: Premium Day-By-Day Version.

I originally created the following 3-month LSAT study schedule for a student of mine. This student is preparing for an LSAT retake, has the goal of 170+, and is able to study for the LSAT full-time from now until Test Day.

If you're not preparing for a retake, use one of the other  LSAT study schedules.

If you're preparing for a retake but can't study full-time, also check out this 3-month LSAT study schedule.

Anyway, if you're:

-retaking

-can study full-time for the 3-month period leading up to Test Day (at least 4-5 hours on most days)

-have the desire to work hard (which is a good idea if you struggle a lot with this stuff and/or want a top score)

the following schedule is a good guideline for you.

Most people (as well as the student I made this schedule for) tend to struggle less with Reading Comp than with the other sections. As such, I've left out RC-specific prep for the earlier portion of the schedule, but you'll be doing a couple dozen exams worth of RC, anyway, so that should be enough.

Aside from that, this schedule will allow you to cover nearly every single LSAT PrepTest's Logic Games and Logical Reasoning questions. It's super-intense but doesn't include the older RC passages, so, as always, feel free to modify as necessary.


If you didn't study properly the first time around, you may want to make some kind of hybrid of the following and one of the original 3-month LSAT study schedules (not for retakers). This one's for people who have already done a good portion of that work.

Without further ado....

The 3-Month LSAT Retake Study Schedule / Plan: Intense Version


Relevant links:

LR Categorizations

LR Analysis Example

LG Categorization for PrepTests 19-38
LG Categorization for PrepTests 39-present


Recommended Books:

See a list of recommended books in Best LSAT Prep Books.



Week 1:

Do every LG from several older PrepTests by type at least twice using my categorization. If you have already used many of the released LSAT exams, you can work out of older PrepTests by using Grouped by Game Type.

Do each game until it makes perfect sense and you're able to solve it efficiently (within a reasonable period of time and inferences/questions flow naturally).


Week 2:

Do every Logical Reasoning question from several older PrepTests by type using the categorization. If you have already used many of the released LSAT exams, you can work out of the older PrepTests by using Grouped by Question Type.

Mark off any questions you answer incorrectly or have trouble on and analyze them in depth. Write out WHY the correct answer is correct and why the incorrect answers (esp. the one you chose) are wrong.


Week 3:

Do Logic Games from several older PrepTests by type using my categorization.

Do each game until it makes perfect sense and you're able to solve it efficiently (within a reasonable period of time and inferences/questions flow naturally).


Week 4:

Do Logical Reasoning questions from several older exams by type using the categorization.

Mark off any questions you answer incorrectly or have trouble on and analyze them in depth. Write out WHY the correct answer is correct and why the incorrect answers (esp. the one you chose) are wrong.


Week 5:

Do Logic Games from several older PrepTests by type using my categorization.

Do each game until it makes perfect sense and you're able to solve it efficiently (within a reasonable period of time and inferences/questions flow naturally).

Do two older PrepTests as full-length timed 4-section exams. Review any questions you answer incorrectly or have trouble on and analyze them in depth. Write out WHY the correct answer is correct and why the incorrect answers (esp. the one you chose) are wrong. Also read the LSAT explanations for the sections that give you trouble.


Week 6:

Do Logical Reasoning questions from several older exams by type using the categorization.

Mark off any questions you answer incorrectly or have trouble on and analyze them in depth. Write out WHY the correct answer is correct and why the incorrect answers (esp. the one you chose) are wrong.

Do two older PrepTests as full-length timed 4-section exams. Review any questions you answer incorrectly or have trouble on and analyze them in depth. Write out WHY the correct answer is correct and why the incorrect answers (esp. the one you chose) are wrong. Also read LSAC's explanations for these questions.

Do a single older PrepTest as a full-length timed 4-section exam. Review, etc.

Week 7:

Do Logic Games from several older PrepTests by type using my categorization.

Do each game until it makes perfect sense and you're able to solve it efficiently (within a reasonable period of time and inferences/questions flow naturally).

Do two older PrepTests as full-length timed 4-section exams. Review, etc.


Week 8:

Do Logical Reasoning questions from several older exams by type using the categorization.

Mark off any questions you answer incorrectly or have trouble on and analyze them in depth. Write out WHY the correct answer is correct and why the incorrect answers (esp. the one you chose) are wrong.

Do two PrepTests as full-length timed exams with Reading Comp sections from other exams inserted to simulate experimental sections. Review, etc.

For the remaining weeks, study each of these Logic Games Explanations after completing the relevant exam.


Week 9: Complete 3 recent LSAT PrepTests (timed). Splice in sections from another to simulate the experimental section. Review all wrong answers and write out explanations for them. Consider using one section to create a 6-section exam for extra practice. Review each exam on alternating days.


Week 10: Complete 3 recent LSAT PrepTests (timed). Splice in sections from another to simulate the experimental section. Review all wrong answers and write out explanations for them. Consider using one section to create a 6-section exam for extra practice. Review each exam on alternating days.


Week 11: Complete 3 recent LSAT PrepTests (timed). Splice in sections from another to simulate the experimental section. Review all wrong answers and write out explanations for them. Consider using one section to create a 6-section exam for extra practice. Review each exam on alternating days.


Week 12: Complete 3 recent LSAT PrepTests (timed). Splice in sections from another to simulate the experimental section. Review all wrong answers and write out explanations for them. Consider using one section to create a 6-section exam for extra practice. Review each exam on alternating days.





20 comments:

  1. I'm not sure if this is a silly question, but when you say study "full-time," about how many hours per day are you talking about?

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  2. Same as above. How many hours per day?

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  3. Great question! At least 4-5 hours on most days. Just edited the blog post to include this.

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  4. Steve, correct me if I'm wrong, but did you say it is possible to complete one of the games in the games section in 7 minutes in one of your blog comments? Huh? Has any one on this blog achieved that time ? My average time is 10min. per game. I am getting better, but keeping it real

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  5. just to comment on the previous comment: yes, it's possible. After many practices I can solve most of the games in 7 mins. Some take as short as 4 mins and some take as long as 12 mins. But 7 mins is definitely not impossible. Do some more practice and you will get better even more!

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  6. Steve, I wasn't sure where else to post this question. I have been studying for over 4 months now, and last night I took a practice test. I was very upset after taking this because my score has not budged even one point from the score I got on the practice test I took before I began studying. I am feeling like all this time I have put into studying has been for nothing, since I keep getting the same score whenever I take a practice test (and my score is very low). I do well on my own, when I'm just working through problems and not timing myself, but as soon as I have to do it under timed conditions I feel like I panic and forget everything I've learned. I was originally supposed to take the June LSAT, but panicked and decided to postpone to October. Now October is getting closer and I'm still not doing any better on timed tests. Any thoughts or advice as to what I could be doing wrong or what I could do to improve my score?

    ReplyDelete
  7. I was/ stll I'm in the same boat as above, but I am now taking a holistic approach towards the lsat, basically: sleeep at least 7 hours per night; avoid all the junkie food (sorry IN & OUT, my favorite place); exercise is a must in these stressful days; I am also doing yoga in the mornings, and finally meditation at night with some soft music (Enigma "Mea Culpa"). This has lower my stress level to a point where my blood pressure is no longer sky high.
    Finally, "The journey of a thousand miles starts with a single step" Sun Tzu

    ReplyDelete
  8. I misquoted wrong the above. It's author is Lao Tzu (Chinese Philosopher), and not Sun Tzu (Chinese Military strategist).

    ReplyDelete
  9. @minimanny

    They were twins. Everyone gets them mixed up.


    @Anonymous 7/20

    I'm so sorry to hear about your trouble. It may be a stress/anxiety issue.

    It may be that you need to gradually decrease the amount of time you allow for each section 40 mins, 39 mins, etc. to get used to the timed component.

    Hope this helps!

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  10. Steve,

    What do I do if I already took the majority if not all of these preptests already when I was preparing for the test the first time?

    I used your three month prep for the October LSAT, and messed up the games section on the day of the test, and wound up with a 165. I am re-taking to hit the 170+ mark I was hitting the last two weeks of my study.

    Is it worth it to take a timed test a second time? I feel like most of these preptests are still fresh in my mind...

    help!

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  11. Hey Steve,

    Just to clarify, are the preptests supposed to be different for weeks 6 and 8? In week 6, you want us to do half the LR problems in PrepTests 31-40, whereas in week 8, you want us to do the other half in 31-38.

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  12. Sorry - meant 31-38. Didn't include 39-42 in this schedule.

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  13. Hi Steve,

    Thanks for this schedule. Two questions:

    1. I was wondering if your 7 month schedule (daily schedule on sale) can work for people retaking the exam.

    2. Also, considering the fact that RC passages have become considerably more difficult in the exams (February of this year, and 2010 exams), how do you suggest preparing for RC as well?

    I took the February LSAT and didn't perform poorly, but the score wasn't quite up to what I want. Reading Comp, usually my best section, was a nightmare and brought my score down. So I want to make sure that I prepare for RC as best as I can this time round, and improve Logical Reasoning as well.

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  14. Hi Elham,

    Yes, it can work for retakers, and I have plenty of blog posts regarding how to prepare for RC in the day-by-day schedules.

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  15. Hi Steve,

    I purchased your 3 month plan and have just started using it but noticed that many of the links connect to posts that were written in 2009 and there are some posts that have been added in 2012. Do you have any suggestions for how to go about finding your post-2009 blog posts through the study schedule and is the 3 month study schedule updated for the later posts?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not to worry. I've updated the day-by-day plan with all the relevant LSAT-related posts you'll need.

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  16. I have taken the lsat 2 times already. first score was 154 second 163, and I have done all the prep tests already. should I still get the retake study schedule?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Only use the retake schedule if you've already worked through one of the day-by-day plans. If you've prepped for the LSAT in the past by taking a prep course but have not used one of the regular day-by-day plans, use the regular day-by-day plan, not the retake day-by-day plan.

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    2. Can you explain what you did to jump from 154 on test one, to 163 on test two? I have about six weeks and I would like to know your strategy. I am currently scoring about 16 on avg between reading comp, and the two Lr, and 18-20 on Logic games. Thanks so much!

      Delete
  17. Hi Steve, if we have already taken the LSAT and have taken a prep course, what are the benefits to using the regular plan as opposed to the retake plan? I am new to your blog, but looking forward to using it!

    ReplyDelete